Abstract Film Camera Drowned Into Fungus “Impermanence” is a series of portraits by Korean photographer and microbiologist Seung-Hwan Oh who drowns his films camera before using them, into a cultivation of fungus mushrooms. The bacterias devour the film for an abstract and destroyed result. A beautiful way to mistreat a film and to rebel against the perfect and idealized pictures we see everywhere nowadays.

Abstract Film Camera Drowned Into Fungus

Abstract Film Camera Drowned Into Fungus “Impermanence” is a series of portraits by Korean photographer and microbiologist Seung-Hwan Oh who drowns his films camera before using them, into a cultivation of fungus mushrooms. The bacterias devour the film for an abstract and destroyed result. A beautiful way to mistreat a film and to rebel against the perfect and idealized pictures we see everywhere nowadays.

Seis Momentos --- inject UV tintas en canvas. (Six Moments --- inkjet UV inks on canvas) Patricio Reig.

Seis Momentos --- inject UV tintas en canvas. (Six Moments --- inkjet UV inks on canvas) Patricio Reig.

© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina

© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina

Stan Strembicki - Post Katrina: Books and Photographs Found After the Flood | LensCulture

Stan Strembicki - Post Katrina: Books and Photographs Found After the Flood | LensCulture

Warped, Waterlogged, and Beautiful  “Anywhere you go, when you see disasters, people grab the pictures,” says documentary photographer Keith Calhoun. “I didn’t value my photos until after Katrina. Now every moment is of value to me because I see how quickly things can change, how nature can claim its course.”  When the photographic archive of Calhoun and his wife and artistic partner, Chandra McCormick, was submerged in the floodwaters of the storm, 30 years’ worth of work was...

Warped, Waterlogged, and Beautiful “Anywhere you go, when you see disasters, people grab the pictures,” says documentary photographer Keith Calhoun. “I didn’t value my photos until after Katrina. Now every moment is of value to me because I see how quickly things can change, how nature can claim its course.” When the photographic archive of Calhoun and his wife and artistic partner, Chandra McCormick, was submerged in the floodwaters of the storm, 30 years’ worth of work was...

© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina

© Stan Strembicki - Memory Loss, Photo Albums Left Behind by Hurricane Katrina

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