"Salt wasn’t always shake-able. In the early part of the 20th century, the Morton Salt Company of Chicago added magnesium carbonate to their salt to make it flow. Before that, salt was clumpy and rough, served in little containers (salt cellars) that you’d pinch your serving out of. Of course, if you were fancy, you’d have something like these silver seashells, with accompanying tiny spoons."

15 Beautiful Objects We Don’t Use Anymore

"Salt wasn’t always shake-able. In the early part of the 20th century, the Morton Salt Company of Chicago added magnesium carbonate to their salt to make it flow. Before that, salt was clumpy and rough, served in little containers (salt cellars) that you’d pinch your serving out of. Of course, if you were fancy, you’d have something like these silver seashells, with accompanying tiny spoons."

ANTIQUE VICTORIAN GOLD GILT GLASS CRYSTAL OPEN SALT CELLAR DISH CUP w SPOON VTG - spoon is most interesting

ANTIQUE VICTORIAN GOLD GILT GLASS CRYSTAL OPEN SALT CELLAR DISH CUP w SPOON VTG

ANTIQUE VICTORIAN GOLD GILT GLASS CRYSTAL OPEN SALT CELLAR DISH CUP w SPOON VTG - spoon is most interesting

Salt Jersey Glass Company of George Dummer  (1824-1862) Date: 1829–40 Geography: Mid-Atlantic, Jersey City, New Jersey, United States Culture: American Medium: Pressed glass

Salt Jersey Glass Company of George Dummer (1824-1862) Date: 1829–40 Geography: Mid-Atlantic, Jersey City, New Jersey, United States Culture: American Medium: Pressed glass

The Exter Salt. Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85). Provenance: Given to King Charles II by the City of Exeter, 1660 A silver-gilt table salt in the form of a tower with cylindrical corner turrets and a tall central turret with an open gallery and domed roof above, resting on a chased mound supported by dragons on ball feet, the salt is encrusted with jewels. The body of the salt (or spice box) is fitted with small drawers.

The Exter Salt. Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85). Provenance: Given to King Charles II by the City of Exeter, 1660 A silver-gilt table salt in the form of a tower with cylindrical corner turrets and a tall central turret with an open gallery and domed roof above, resting on a chased mound supported by dragons on ball feet, the salt is encrusted with jewels. The body of the salt (or spice box) is fitted with small drawers.

Pinterest
Search