Dead young woman. Note her hands. The frameworks fastened at the waist and neck with heavy gauge wire to position and hold the arms. The clothes were left unfastened at the back.

Dead young woman. Note her hands. The frameworks fastened at the waist and neck with heavy gauge wire to position and hold the arms. The clothes were left unfastened at the back.

A very "fresh" post mortem.  Many times if death was expected shortly, a photographer would be sent for and be at the family's home just moments before or after death.

A very "fresh" post mortem. Many times if death was expected shortly, a photographer would be sent for and be at the family's home just moments before or after death.

This darling little girl appears as if she is a delicate china doll sitting on a shelf. Notice that she is not sitting as one normally would, but is turned to the side so that that a stand can be used to hold her in place. Her thin little arms have no muscle tone whatsoever and have been carefully placed into position.  This sweet little angel could have easily succumbed to mumps as this disease was a major killer during the Victorian era.

This darling little girl appears as if she is a delicate china doll sitting on a shelf. Notice that she is not sitting as one normally would, but is turned to the side so that that a stand can be used to hold her in place. Her thin little arms have no muscle tone whatsoever and have been carefully placed into position. This sweet little angel could have easily succumbed to mumps as this disease was a major killer during the Victorian era.

A Victorian-era lachrymosa, also called lachrymatory, tear catchers, or tear vials. Sometimes worn on a necklace, sometimes merely held, they were used the gather the tears wept by mourners at funerals. One type of lachrymosa had a special top which allowed the tears to evaporate (signifying the time to stop mourning), others had a sealed top to allow the tears to last for a year, at which point they would be poured on the grave of the person whom the tears were wept for.

A Victorian-era lachrymosa, also called lachrymatory, tear catchers, or tear vials. Sometimes worn on a necklace, sometimes merely held, they were used the gather the tears wept by mourners at funerals. One type of lachrymosa had a special top which allowed the tears to evaporate (signifying the time to stop mourning), others had a sealed top to allow the tears to last for a year, at which point they would be poured on the grave of the person whom the tears were wept for.

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