More ideas from Natasha
Mrs. Keyte of Blockley, Gloucestershire had a pet trout that would eat worms from her hand. When it died in 1855, she erected a tombstone in its honor. That tombstone remains one of the most popular tourist attractions in Blockley. And it's perhaps the only tombstone for a trout in the world. [National Geographic, 1917]

Mrs. Keyte of Blockley, Gloucestershire had a pet trout that would eat worms from her hand. When it died in 1855, she erected a tombstone in its honor. That tombstone remains one of the most popular tourist attractions in Blockley. And it's perhaps the only tombstone for a trout in the world. [National Geographic, 1917]

Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich created this fake pool called The Swimming Pool, for The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Leandro put two clear acrylic glasses about a foot apart and filled the space in between with water. The top surface is also filled with about 4 to 5 inches of water so that it looks like a realistic pool.

Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich created this fake pool called The Swimming Pool, for The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Leandro put two clear acrylic glasses about a foot apart and filled the space in between with water. The top surface is also filled with about 4 to 5 inches of water so that it looks like a realistic pool.