Under the Microscope

Images from BCI microscopy; light microscopes and tissue sections, fluorescence microscopes, or confocal microscopes.
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Dotted c-Met staining (green) in breast cancer cells. Image from the Kermorgant lab in the Centre for Tumour Biology.

Dotted c-Met staining (green) in breast cancer cells. Image from the Kermorgant lab in the Centre for Tumour Biology.

Studying cancer cell spreading: a zebrafish embryo implanted with a tumour, shown in red. The small red dots (metastatic cells) spreading from the initial tumour will enable the formation of new cancers in different parts of the body. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

Studying cancer cell spreading: a zebrafish embryo implanted with a tumour, shown in red. The small red dots (metastatic cells) spreading from the initial tumour will enable the formation of new cancers in different parts of the body. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

The developing wing of fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster showing the dorsal compartment (green), which is vital for correct formation of the adult wing. Image by Alex Fulford

The developing wing of fruit fly Drosophila Melanogaster showing the dorsal compartment (green), which is vital for correct formation of the adult wing. Image by Alex Fulford

A mouse mammary gland organoid undergoing branching morphogenesis (formation of new ducts) in a 3D culture. Cells are labelled red and blue, and myoepithelial cells on the periphery also labelled with green. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

A mouse mammary gland organoid undergoing branching morphogenesis (formation of new ducts) in a 3D culture. Cells are labelled red and blue, and myoepithelial cells on the periphery also labelled with green. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

3D reconstruction of Drosophila melanogaster adult gut; in flies, it is similar to mammals in both structure and function. Here, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and enteroblasts (EBs) are labelled with GFP in green. These cells are found in pairs because ISCs are dividing to generate one ISCs and one EB. The rest of the epithelium contains enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes. The gut is surrounded by F-actin rich muscles, stained in red. Nuclei in blue. Image by Dr Cecilia Huertas

3D reconstruction of Drosophila melanogaster adult gut; in flies, it is similar to mammals in both structure and function. Here, intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and enteroblasts (EBs) are labelled with GFP in green. These cells are found in pairs because ISCs are dividing to generate one ISCs and one EB. The rest of the epithelium contains enteroendocrine cells and enterocytes. The gut is surrounded by F-actin rich muscles, stained in red. Nuclei in blue. Image by Dr Cecilia Huertas

Oral squamous cell carcinoma cells completing cell division. This electron micrograph was taken during a migration assay. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Oral squamous cell carcinoma cells completing cell division. This electron micrograph was taken during a migration assay. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Electron micrograph: oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Dogma states EMT is the driver of invasion and metastasis. This image shows two invading cells invading cohesively that have not undergone EMT. Invasion requires degradation of collagen matrix, confirmed by careful observation and this imaging. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Electron micrograph: oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Dogma states EMT is the driver of invasion and metastasis. This image shows two invading cells invading cohesively that have not undergone EMT. Invasion requires degradation of collagen matrix, confirmed by careful observation and this imaging. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Electron micrograph of an oral squamous carcinoma cell in a migration assay. By looking at the front of the cell this image revealed the complex response of a cell under going directed migration. The changes in the membrane protrusions seem to indicate a polar response possibly to a soluble agent. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Electron micrograph of an oral squamous carcinoma cell in a migration assay. By looking at the front of the cell this image revealed the complex response of a cell under going directed migration. The changes in the membrane protrusions seem to indicate a polar response possibly to a soluble agent. Image by Professor John F Marshall

Two mouse mammary gland organoids made up of epithelial (red & blue) and myoepithelial (red, blue, green) cells growing in a 3D matrix. Right: a normal cross-section of a duct structure. Left: invasive cells moving into the surrounding area, like cancer. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

Two mouse mammary gland organoids made up of epithelial (red & blue) and myoepithelial (red, blue, green) cells growing in a 3D matrix. Right: a normal cross-section of a duct structure. Left: invasive cells moving into the surrounding area, like cancer. Image by Dr Teresa Arnandis

Phosphorylated FAK labelled in green in endothelial (blood vessel) cells - showing a protein that helps cells stick to a surface. Image by Dr Tanguy Lechertier

Phosphorylated FAK labelled in green in endothelial (blood vessel) cells - showing a protein that helps cells stick to a surface. Image by Dr Tanguy Lechertier

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