I have always achieved excellent results, growing my sweet peas in peat free compost. For my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial I used Dalefoot Potting Compost, a peat free compost made from natural ingredients, including sheep's wool.

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This Restrepia antennifera specimen has produced a keiki. Pictured on the 16th October 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.

The ridged Rootrainers cells direct the plants' roots to grow vertically towards the drainage hole. Rootrainers are easy to assemble, they open out like a book, allowing you to monitor how your plants' roots are developing whenever it's convenient. I grew all of the Sweet Pea plants for my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial in Deep Rootrainers.

I grow my sweet peas in Deep Rootrainers - deep seed trays, which feature ridged cells, designed to encourage the formation of strong, healthy roots. Each section of a Rootrainers tray is removable. The sections unfold and open out like a book, allowing easy examination of the plants' root system as it develops, and ensuring the straightforward removal of your seedlings when it comes to planting.

I sowed all of the Sweet Pea seeds for my 2016 Sweet Pea Trial in Dalefoot Composts Wool Potting Compost. This peat free compost is made from a blend of compost that includes sheep's wool and bracken in the ingredients. Dalefoot Composts Wool Compost is naturally water retentive, meaning that your seedlings don't require watering as frequently.

Sweet Pea seedlings. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

Sweet Pea seedlings sown on 26th October 2014, pictured on 16th November 2014. I sowed all of my Sweet Peas for this trial in Rootrainers, using New Horizon Organic and Peat Free Multi Purpose Compost.

Pictured on the 2nd April 2016, this Restrepia sanguinea is producing a new plant. Often known as a keiki, which is a Hawaiian word for a baby or young child, this new plant has been produced asexually, and will be a clone of the mother plant.

Here's another photograph of the keiki produced by my Restrepia sanguinea. Phalaenopsis, Oncidiums and Dendrobiums are orchids better known for reproducing asexually in this way. This Restrepia sanguinea was pictured on the 3rd April 2016, inside my BiOrbAir terrarium.

The keiki that had formed on my Restrepia sanguinea fell away from its mother plant on the 8th June 2016. Just a few of the keiki's roots remain where it was growing.

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