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The introduction of metalworking around 2500 BC and its development are documented. Copper axes and daggers, shields, cauldrons and cast bronze horns (the earliest known Irish musical instruments) are displayed. The exhibition also contains jewellery made from amber, glass and stone as well as wooden examples of shields, wheels and cauldrons. Prominently displayed is a 4,500-year-old logboat from Lurgan, Co. Galway - one of the largest vessels of its type to have been found in Ireland.

The introduction of metalworking around 2500 BC and its development are documented. Copper axes and daggers, shields, cauldrons and cast bronze horns (the earliest known Irish musical instruments) are displayed. The exhibition also contains jewellery made from amber, glass and stone as well as wooden examples of shields, wheels and cauldrons. Prominently displayed is a 4,500-year-old logboat from Lurgan, Co. Galway - one of the largest vessels of its type to have been found in Ireland.

A detail from St. Manchan's Shrine, Boher, Ballycumber, Co. Offaly, Ireland. Made at Clonmacnois about 1130 A.D. The happy guy third from the left, holding an axe, is thought to be St. Olaf of Norway. This shrine is ranked among the Treasures of Ireland and is possibly the only such religious shrine to remain with the people who love it in its home parish. The ornamental work is a mix of Viking and Irish styles. text and photo by Alan Lonergan on flickr

A detail from St. Manchan's Shrine, Boher, Ballycumber, Co. Offaly, Ireland. Made at Clonmacnois about 1130 A.D. The happy guy third from the left, holding an axe, is thought to be St. Olaf of Norway. This shrine is ranked among the Treasures of Ireland and is possibly the only such religious shrine to remain with the people who love it in its home parish. The ornamental work is a mix of Viking and Irish styles. text and photo by Alan Lonergan on flickr

This silver brooch was found in Galway in 1854. Dating from the c. 8th/9th centuries AD it is similar to a number of Pictish brooches from Scotland.

This silver brooch was found in Galway in 1854. Dating from the c. 8th/9th centuries AD it is similar to a number of Pictish brooches from Scotland.

Newgrange, Meath Date: ca. 1904 - 1910  Newgrange passage tomb is one of Ireland's most important and oldest archaeological sites. This photograph was taken before the excavation that uncovered the roof box through which the winter solstice sun lights up the ancient tomb.

Newgrange, Meath Date: ca. 1904 - 1910 Newgrange passage tomb is one of Ireland's most important and oldest archaeological sites. This photograph was taken before the excavation that uncovered the roof box through which the winter solstice sun lights up the ancient tomb.

NEWGRANGE is a prehistoric monument in County Meath, Ireland, about one kilometre north of the River Boyne. It was built about 3200 BC, during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. Newgrange is a large circular mound with a stone passageway and chambers inside. The mound has a retaining wall at the front and is ringed by 'kerbstones' engraved with artwork.

NEWGRANGE is a prehistoric monument in County Meath, Ireland, about one kilometre north of the River Boyne. It was built about 3200 BC, during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Egyptian pyramids. Newgrange is a large circular mound with a stone passageway and chambers inside. The mound has a retaining wall at the front and is ringed by 'kerbstones' engraved with artwork.

Detail from St. Manchans Shrine, Boher, Ballycumber, Co. Offaly, Ireland | Flickr: Intercambio de fotos

Detail from St. Manchans Shrine, Boher, Ballycumber, Co. Offaly, Ireland | Flickr: Intercambio de fotos

Vikings: The period 837-873 was a period of Viking penetration and Irish reaction. This phase began dramatically with two large fleets of Norsemen in 837 on the Boyne and Liffey. Each fleet was said to have comprised three score ships. Their leader may have been the chieftan Saxolb who was killed later that year in Ireland. There was no unified response from the Irish and soon afterwards two naval encampments were established by the Vikings, at Annagassan, Co. Louth and at Dublin (Duiblinn).

Vikings: The period 837-873 was a period of Viking penetration and Irish reaction. This phase began dramatically with two large fleets of Norsemen in 837 on the Boyne and Liffey. Each fleet was said to have comprised three score ships. Their leader may have been the chieftan Saxolb who was killed later that year in Ireland. There was no unified response from the Irish and soon afterwards two naval encampments were established by the Vikings, at Annagassan, Co. Louth and at Dublin (Duiblinn).

Belfast Women banging out the news of the death of one of the Hunger Strikers. This image was later used by mural artists to depict women in the struggle.

Belfast Women banging out the news of the death of one of the Hunger Strikers. This image was later used by mural artists to depict women in the struggle.

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