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Women celebrating right to vote:

Women celebrating right to vote:

vintage everyday: 100 Interesting Vintage Photos of Women Pictured From Behind Over Last Century

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Of her life's work, cultural anthropologist, museum curator and feminist scholar Margaret Mead once said, "I have spent most of my life studying the lives of other peoples — faraway peoples — so that Americans might better understand themselves." Mead's professor and mentor Franz Boas is credited with the concept of cultural relativism in American anthropology, but it was Mead who truly eradicated the concept of the "savage" through her extensive fieldwork in the Pacific.

The 25 Most Powerful Women of the Past Century

Of her life's work, cultural anthropologist, museum curator and feminist scholar Margaret Mead once said, "I have spent most of my life studying the lives of other peoples — faraway peoples — so that Americans might better understand themselves." Mead's professor and mentor Franz Boas is credited with the concept of cultural relativism in American anthropology, but it was Mead who truly eradicated the concept of the "savage" through her extensive fieldwork in the Pacific.

Practicing her Speech for Women's Suffrage:

Practicing her Speech for Women's Suffrage:

female scientists you may not know  1. Ada Lovelace-Analyst, metaphysician, and founder of scientific computing.  2. Rosalind Franklin-Biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer   3. Rachel Carson-Marine biologist  4. Lise Meitner- physicist  5. Cecilia Payne -Astronomer and astrophysicist   6. Mary Anning- paleontologist

female scientists you may not know 1. Ada Lovelace-Analyst, metaphysician, and founder of scientific computing. 2. Rosalind Franklin-Biophysicist and X-ray crystallographer 3. Rachel Carson-Marine biologist 4. Lise Meitner- physicist 5. Cecilia Payne -Astronomer and astrophysicist 6. Mary Anning- paleontologist

The 'Harvard Computers' (a.k.a. 'Pickering's Women' or 'Pickering's Harem') - the group of women who processed astronomical data and catalogued stars for the astronomer Edward Charles Pickering at Hardvard Observatory. Photo taken c. 1890.

The 'Harvard Computers' (a.k.a. 'Pickering's Women' or 'Pickering's Harem') - the group of women who processed astronomical data and catalogued stars for the astronomer Edward Charles Pickering at Hardvard Observatory. Photo taken c. 1890.

Williamina Fleming started her astrology career as a housekeeper then secretary at Harvard's Observatory. She invented a star cataloging system, discovered more than 10,000 stars, discovered over 50 nebulae including the Horsehead Nebula and penned the term "white dwarfs" which our sun will eventually become. She published a book containing data on over 200 variable stars and influenced the employ of an entire team of women known as the "Harvard Computer's."

Williamina Fleming started her astrology career as a housekeeper then secretary at Harvard's Observatory. She invented a star cataloging system, discovered more than 10,000 stars, discovered over 50 nebulae including the Horsehead Nebula and penned the term "white dwarfs" which our sun will eventually become. She published a book containing data on over 200 variable stars and influenced the employ of an entire team of women known as the "Harvard Computer's."

Lowell staff seated by the Clark Telescope in 1905. Left to right: Harry Hussey, Wrexie Leonard, V.M. Slipher, Percival Lowell, Carl Lampland, and John C. Duncan.

Lowell staff seated by the Clark Telescope in 1905. Left to right: Harry Hussey, Wrexie Leonard, V.M. Slipher, Percival Lowell, Carl Lampland, and John C. Duncan.

El 15 de mayo de 1857 nacía en Dundee (Escocia) Williamina Paton Stevens  Fleming, una maestra de escuela cuyas dotes científicas le ac...

El 15 de mayo de 1857 nacía en Dundee (Escocia) Williamina Paton Stevens Fleming, una maestra de escuela cuyas dotes científicas le ac...

Hinduism has positive and negative golden rules: "One who regards all creatures as his own self, and behaves towards them as towards his own self attains happiness. One should never do to another what one regards as hurtful to one's own self. This, in brief, is the rule of righteousness. In happiness and misery, in the agreeable and the disagreeable, one should judge effects as if they came to one's own self." (Mahabharata bk. 13: Anusasana Parva, §113) 400 BCE

Hinduism has positive and negative golden rules: "One who regards all creatures as his own self, and behaves towards them as towards his own self attains happiness. One should never do to another what one regards as hurtful to one's own self. This, in brief, is the rule of righteousness. In happiness and misery, in the agreeable and the disagreeable, one should judge effects as if they came to one's own self." (Mahabharata bk. 13: Anusasana Parva, §113) 400 BCE

Percival Lowell, founder of Lowell Observatory, looking through the Clark telescope.

Percival Lowell, founder of Lowell Observatory, looking through the Clark telescope.