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A boat burial from Kaupang, Norway, early tenth century. Illustration by Þórhallur Þráinsson, © Neil Price

A boat burial from Kaupang, Norway, early tenth century. Illustration by Þórhallur Þráinsson, © Neil Price

Anchor - Anchors were usually made from stone lashed into a wooden frame (left). The anchor shown (from Denmark) is made entirely of iron and is about 1.5m (5ft) in the long dimension. Some of the more elaborate anchors that have been found use an iron bound wooden shank and have iron rings to accommodate the cable.

Anchor - Anchors were usually made from stone lashed into a wooden frame (left). The anchor shown (from Denmark) is made entirely of iron and is about 1.5m (5ft) in the long dimension. Some of the more elaborate anchors that have been found use an iron bound wooden shank and have iron rings to accommodate the cable.

Gokstad tent pole heads Scanned from "The Viking-Ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway" by N. Nicolaysen 1882 (now out of copyright)

Gokstad tent pole heads Scanned from "The Viking-Ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway" by N. Nicolaysen 1882 (now out of copyright)

Jawbone and helmet of a young Viking Warrior @ The British Museum....quite breathtaking

Jawbone and helmet of a young Viking Warrior @ The British Museum....quite breathtaking

Vikings' crystal clear method of navigation - image 2 - life - 31 January 2011 - New Scientist

Vikings' crystal clear method of navigation - image 2 - life - 31 January 2011 - New Scientist

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