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Hans Busch (27 February 1884 in Jüchen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany – 16 February 1973 in Darmstadt, Hesse) was a German physicist. He was a pioneer of electron optics and laid the theoretical basis for the electron microscope.

Hans Busch (27 February 1884 in Jüchen, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany – 16 February 1973 in Darmstadt, Hesse) was a German physicist. He was a pioneer of electron optics and laid the theoretical basis for the electron microscope.

The electron microscope used wavelengths that were 100,000 times smaller than light wavelengths because they need to be in a vacuum. These waves went through an organism, which was also contained in the vacuum, and onto a photographic plate. The plate would contain the organism’s image left behind. A key point to make is that Ruska’s electron microscope was actually able to magnify 10 times more than a modern light microscope.

The electron microscope used wavelengths that were 100,000 times smaller than light wavelengths because they need to be in a vacuum. These waves went through an organism, which was also contained in the vacuum, and onto a photographic plate. The plate would contain the organism’s image left behind. A key point to make is that Ruska’s electron microscope was actually able to magnify 10 times more than a modern light microscope.

During the War, Strassmann was on the Alsos list, the Manhattan Project's military intelligence effort to capture known, enemy nuclear scientists in an attempt to learn how far Germany had progressed in its efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. It was soon revealed, however, that Strassmann was not involved in any German attempt to build an atomic bomb. In fact, he and his wife Maria had concealed a Jewish friend in their apartment for months during the war, putting themselves at risk

During the War, Strassmann was on the Alsos list, the Manhattan Project's military intelligence effort to capture known, enemy nuclear scientists in an attempt to learn how far Germany had progressed in its efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. It was soon revealed, however, that Strassmann was not involved in any German attempt to build an atomic bomb. In fact, he and his wife Maria had concealed a Jewish friend in their apartment for months during the war, putting themselves at risk

15 February — The discovery and clinical development of Prontosil, the first broadly effective antibacterial drug, is published in a series of articles in Germany's pre-eminent medical journal, Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift, by Gerhard Domagk.

15 February — The discovery and clinical development of Prontosil, the first broadly effective antibacterial drug, is published in a series of articles in Germany's pre-eminent medical journal, Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift, by Gerhard Domagk.

Werner Heisenberg was after the expulsion of Jews, NAZI Germany's top theoretical physicist and was chosen to lead the NAZI bomb project. He was by all accounts a cultured man and mentored many young physicists, including Jews and foreigners. Here he is about 1930 with some of the young physicists he mentored.

Werner Heisenberg was after the expulsion of Jews, NAZI Germany's top theoretical physicist and was chosen to lead the NAZI bomb project. He was by all accounts a cultured man and mentored many young physicists, including Jews and foreigners. Here he is about 1930 with some of the young physicists he mentored.

Zuse Z1 in living room, Germany, 1938

Zuse Z1 in living room, Germany, 1938

Science-During the Nazi era, German scientists and engineers either developed or greatly improved television, jet-propelled aircraft (including the ejection seat), guided missiles, electronic computers, the electron microscope, atomic fission, data-processing technologies, pesticides, and, of course, the world's first industrial murder complexes. The first magnetic tape recording was of a speech by Hitler, and the nerve gases Sarin and Tabun were Nazi inventions.

Science-During the Nazi era, German scientists and engineers either developed or greatly improved television, jet-propelled aircraft (including the ejection seat), guided missiles, electronic computers, the electron microscope, atomic fission, data-processing technologies, pesticides, and, of course, the world's first industrial murder complexes. The first magnetic tape recording was of a speech by Hitler, and the nerve gases Sarin and Tabun were Nazi inventions.

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