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Thirty years as president too bad

Thirty years as president too bad

For the past half-century, the Burmese junta controlled all branches of power in Myanmar, impoverishing the country and abusing its people. But within the last year, President Thein Sein has showed an inclination toward reform: Burma held parliamentary elections in April, when the opposition National League for Democracy was allowed to openly campaign and won 43 seats, including one for its leader, longtime dissident Aung San Suu Kyi.

For the past half-century, the Burmese junta controlled all branches of power in Myanmar, impoverishing the country and abusing its people. But within the last year, President Thein Sein has showed an inclination toward reform: Burma held parliamentary elections in April, when the opposition National League for Democracy was allowed to openly campaign and won 43 seats, including one for its leader, longtime dissident Aung San Suu Kyi.

Republican President Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt and Booker T. Washington at the Tuskegee Institute, Alabama. 1905

Republican President Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt and Booker T. Washington at the Tuskegee Institute, Alabama. 1905

George Washington, born February 22, 1732 ~ First President of the United States of America

George Washington, born February 22, 1732 ~ First President of the United States of America

President Lyndon Johnson howls with his dog as his grandson Patrick Lyndon Nugent looks on Jan. 6, 1968. "The American Presidency", an exhibit of candid photos of U.S. president rarely seen started Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2004, at the National Archives in Washington. The exhibit inaugurated the Archives' Lawrence F. O'Brien Gallery, named for the postmaster general under President Johnson. (AP Photo/Yoichi Okamoto, National Archives, Johnson Library) AP2004

President Lyndon Johnson howls with his dog as his grandson Patrick Lyndon Nugent looks on Jan. 6, 1968. "The American Presidency", an exhibit of candid photos of U.S. president rarely seen started Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2004, at the National Archives in Washington. The exhibit inaugurated the Archives' Lawrence F. O'Brien Gallery, named for the postmaster general under President Johnson. (AP Photo/Yoichi Okamoto, National Archives, Johnson Library) AP2004

A German World War II prisoner, released by the Soviet Union, is reunited with his daughter. The child had not seen her father since she was one year old.

40 Of The Most Powerful Photographs Ever Taken

A German World War II prisoner, released by the Soviet Union, is reunited with his daughter. The child had not seen her father since she was one year old.

Ordinary people. The courage to say no. The photo was taken in Hamburg in 1936, during the celebrations for the launch of a ship. In the crowed, one person refuses to raise his arm to give the Nazi salute. The man was August Landmesser. He had already been in trouble with the authorities, having been sentenced to two years hard labour for marrying a Jewish woman.

Ordinary people. The courage to say no. The photo was taken in Hamburg in 1936, during the celebrations for the launch of a ship. In the crowed, one person refuses to raise his arm to give the Nazi salute. The man was August Landmesser. He had already been in trouble with the authorities, having been sentenced to two years hard labour for marrying a Jewish woman.

FLASHBACK: 1968. The day after the Chicago City Council voted to rename South Park Way after the recently assassinated Martin Luther King Jr, summer students at Dunbar Vocational High School Willie Thornton, Lamar Jackson and Pat Foster couldn't wait for the city to change the signs. Some aldermen had complained that King deserved more of a tribute. That came five years later when Illinois became the first state to honor the civil-rights leader with a holiday.

FLASHBACK: 1968. The day after the Chicago City Council voted to rename South Park Way after the recently assassinated Martin Luther King Jr, summer students at Dunbar Vocational High School Willie Thornton, Lamar Jackson and Pat Foster couldn't wait for the city to change the signs. Some aldermen had complained that King deserved more of a tribute. That came five years later when Illinois became the first state to honor the civil-rights leader with a holiday.

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