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Pterium,View of the Ruin of the Temple (Charles Texier) (Erdinç Bakla archive) (B)

Pterium,View of the Ruin of the Temple (Charles Texier) (Erdinç Bakla archive) (B)

The Green Stone - A massive green rock cube located in the ruins of Hattusa, capital of the Hittite empire. Probably had religious significance, may have been a gift or reparation from an Egyptian pharaoh.

The Green Stone - A massive green rock cube located in the ruins of Hattusa, capital of the Hittite empire. Probably had religious significance, may have been a gift or reparation from an Egyptian pharaoh.

Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Hattushash, the ruins of the Hittite city, Anatolia, Turkey

Yann Arthus-Bertrand, Hattushash, the ruins of the Hittite city, Anatolia, Turkey

The Treaty of Kadesh. Discovered in the ruins of Hattusa. It is the oldest peace treaty known to date. Made by The Egyptian and Hititte empire to keep the piece after almost 200 years of fighting. It was concluded by Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II and Hittite King Hattusili III. It was concluded around 1259 BC. A copy of this treaty is displayed at the United Nations headquaters in New York.

The Treaty of Kadesh. Discovered in the ruins of Hattusa. It is the oldest peace treaty known to date. Made by The Egyptian and Hititte empire to keep the piece after almost 200 years of fighting. It was concluded by Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II and Hittite King Hattusili III. It was concluded around 1259 BC. A copy of this treaty is displayed at the United Nations headquaters in New York.

The ruins of Warsama's palace, King of Kanesh, one of the oldest examples of the Anatolian palaces, 1800-1750 BCE. Hittite

5 Key Sites Of The Hittite Empire

The ruins of Warsama's palace, King of Kanesh, one of the oldest examples of the Anatolian palaces, 1800-1750 BCE. Hittite

The ruins of Karum, the capital trading centre of the Assyrian merchants in Anatolia in the first quarter of the 2nd millenium BCE. Hittite

5 Key Sites Of The Hittite Empire

The ruins of Karum, the capital trading centre of the Assyrian merchants in Anatolia in the first quarter of the 2nd millenium BCE. Hittite

Ruins of Karatepe in Turkey - the ruins of an old Hittite city

Ruins of Karatepe in Turkey - the ruins of an old Hittite city

Genesis 23 reports that Abraham buried Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah purchased from Ephron the Hittite. 2 Samuel 11 tells of David’s adultery with Bathsheba, wife of Uriah the Hittite. A century ago the Hittites were unknown outside of the OT. In 1906, however, archaeologists discovered the ruins of Hattusas, Turkey the ancient Hittite capital at what is today called Boghazkoy; its vast collection of Hittite historical records, which showed an empire flourishing in the mid-second millennium…

Anatolia – The Craddle of Civilization

Genesis 23 reports that Abraham buried Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah purchased from Ephron the Hittite. 2 Samuel 11 tells of David’s adultery with Bathsheba, wife of Uriah the Hittite. A century ago the Hittites were unknown outside of the OT. In 1906, however, archaeologists discovered the ruins of Hattusas, Turkey the ancient Hittite capital at what is today called Boghazkoy; its vast collection of Hittite historical records, which showed an empire flourishing in the mid-second millennium…

Genesis 23 reports that Abraham buried Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah purchased from Ephron the Hittite. 2 Samuel 11 tells of David’s adultery with Bathsheba, wife of Uriah the Hittite. A century ago the Hittites were unknown outside of the OT. In 1906, however, archaeologists discovered the ruins of Hattusas, Turkey the ancient Hittite capital at what is today called Boghazkoy; its vast collection of Hittite historical records, which showed an empire flourishing in the mid-second millennium…

Anatolia – The Craddle of Civilization

Genesis 23 reports that Abraham buried Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah purchased from Ephron the Hittite. 2 Samuel 11 tells of David’s adultery with Bathsheba, wife of Uriah the Hittite. A century ago the Hittites were unknown outside of the OT. In 1906, however, archaeologists discovered the ruins of Hattusas, Turkey the ancient Hittite capital at what is today called Boghazkoy; its vast collection of Hittite historical records, which showed an empire flourishing in the mid-second millennium…

The Green Stone - A massive green rock cube located in the ruins of Hattusa, capital of the Hittite empire. Probably had religious significance, may have been a gift or reparation from an Egyptian pharaoh.

The Green Stone - A massive green rock cube located in the ruins of Hattusa, capital of the Hittite empire. Probably had religious significance, may have been a gift or reparation from an Egyptian pharaoh.

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