Explore Drake Photos, White Things and more!

Explore related topics

Smew Drake or White Merganser. Merganser birds are fish-feeding ducks have serrated edges to their bills to help them grip their prey; they are therefore often known as "sawbills". In addition to fish, they take a wide range of other aquatic prey, such as molluscs, crustaceans, worms, insect larvae, and amphibians; more rarely, small mammals and birds.  When not diving for food, they are usually seen swimming on the water surface, or resting on rocks in midstream.

Smew Drake or White Merganser. Merganser birds are fish-feeding ducks have serrated edges to their bills to help them grip their prey; they are therefore often known as "sawbills". In addition to fish, they take a wide range of other aquatic prey, such as molluscs, crustaceans, worms, insect larvae, and amphibians; more rarely, small mammals and birds. When not diving for food, they are usually seen swimming on the water surface, or resting on rocks in midstream.

Canvasback, Aythya valisineria, a diving duck, the largest found in N A. Its breeding habitat is in N A prairie potholes

Canvasback, Aythya valisineria, a diving duck, the largest found in N A. Its breeding habitat is in N A prairie potholes

Hooded Merganser - year round eastern US, winter in western US, summer NE US

Hooded Merganser - year round eastern US, winter in western US, summer NE US

Meet a beautiful Bahama pintail duck

Photo: Meet a beautiful Bahama pintail duck

Hooded Merganser, Lophodytes cucullatus. Merganser birds are fish-feeding ducks have serrated edges to their bills to help them grip their prey; they are therefore often known as "sawbills". In addition to fish, they take a wide range of other aquatic prey, such as molluscs, crustaceans, worms, insect larvae, and amphibians; more rarely, small mammals and birds.  When not diving for food, they are usually seen swimming on the water surface, or resting on rocks in midstream.

Hooded Merganser, Lophodytes cucullatus. Merganser birds are fish-feeding ducks have serrated edges to their bills to help them grip their prey; they are therefore often known as "sawbills". In addition to fish, they take a wide range of other aquatic prey, such as molluscs, crustaceans, worms, insect larvae, and amphibians; more rarely, small mammals and birds. When not diving for food, they are usually seen swimming on the water surface, or resting on rocks in midstream.

Pinterest
Search