Explore Ceramics Jomon, Ceramics Vessels and more!

Great Wave -- Kitamura Junko, 1993  Kitamura creates modern forms that reflect her upbringing in ancient Kyoto. Inspired by primitive Jomon pottery (10,500-300 BC), Kitamura creates monochrome vessels with mysterious spiral motifs consisting of dots and detailed patterning. After impressing miniscule geometric shapes into patterns reflective of textile, lacquer and other craft motifs, she covers the work in black-brown slip before bisque firing.

Great Wave -- Kitamura Junko, 1993 Kitamura creates modern forms that reflect her upbringing in ancient Kyoto. Inspired by primitive Jomon pottery (10,500-300 BC), Kitamura creates monochrome vessels with mysterious spiral motifs consisting of dots and detailed patterning. After impressing miniscule geometric shapes into patterns reflective of textile, lacquer and other craft motifs, she covers the work in black-brown slip before bisque firing.

A superb example of one of the early Jomon pots with four pointed shoulders and elaborate spiral decoration.  The Jomon Culture in Japan is one of the strangest Prehistoric cultures in the world. It was extremely long lived, beginning in the Upper Palaeolithic around 13000 BC and lasting down to around 800 BC, but they never developed agriculture but remained based on foraging for nuts and fish.

A superb example of one of the early Jomon pots with four pointed shoulders and elaborate spiral decoration. The Jomon Culture in Japan is one of the strangest Prehistoric cultures in the world. It was extremely long lived, beginning in the Upper Palaeolithic around 13000 BC and lasting down to around 800 BC, but they never developed agriculture but remained based on foraging for nuts and fish.

模様や形が独特な上野遺跡の壺                                                       …

模様や形が独特な上野遺跡の壺 …

Vase with Seascape - Kitamura Junko  1992  Kitamura creates modern forms that reflect her upbringing in ancient Kyoto. Inspired by primitive Jomon pottery (10,500-300 BC), Kitamura creates monochrome vessels with mysterious spiral motifs consisting of dots and detailed patterning. After impressing miniscule geometric shapes into patterns reflective of textile, lacquer and other craft motifs, she covers the work in black-brown slip before bisque firing.

Vase with Seascape - Kitamura Junko 1992 Kitamura creates modern forms that reflect her upbringing in ancient Kyoto. Inspired by primitive Jomon pottery (10,500-300 BC), Kitamura creates monochrome vessels with mysterious spiral motifs consisting of dots and detailed patterning. After impressing miniscule geometric shapes into patterns reflective of textile, lacquer and other craft motifs, she covers the work in black-brown slip before bisque firing.

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