The International Year of Light is also about astronomy... well, this curve is called "analemma" and it occurs because of our elliptical and tilted orbit around the sun. Today, the Winter Solstice day in Earth's northern hemisphere, the sun is at the bottom of the analemma...  “At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” ‪#‎LRO‬ ‪#‎IYL2015

The International Year of Light is also about astronomy... well, this curve is called "analemma" and it occurs because of our elliptical and tilted orbit around the sun. Today, the Winter Solstice day in Earth's northern hemisphere, the sun is at the bottom of the analemma... “At times our own light goes out and is rekindled by a spark from another person. Each of us has cause to think with deep gratitude of those who have lighted the flame within us.” ‪#‎LRO‬ ‪#‎IYL2015

Gallery: Amazing Skywatcher Photos from Around the World | More than 30 images were taken to make this composite photo of the sun's movement across the sky in 2011. The images shows what scientists call the analemma, the movement of the sun in the sky over the course of a year. The background image was also taken separately without a solar filter.

Gallery: Amazing Skywatcher Photos from Around the World | More than 30 images were taken to make this composite photo of the sun's movement across the sky in 2011. The images shows what scientists call the analemma, the movement of the sun in the sky over the course of a year. The background image was also taken separately without a solar filter.

NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day is this view of the October 8 lunar eclipse taken by Yuri Beletsky at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The shadow of the Earth cutting through, the glow, the misty sea that fades into the sky itself—so otherworldly and ethereal.

Beautiful view of the lunar eclipse over the Pacific coast

NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day is this view of the October 8 lunar eclipse taken by Yuri Beletsky at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The shadow of the Earth cutting through, the glow, the misty sea that fades into the sky itself—so otherworldly and ethereal.

The winter solstice occurs exactly when the Earth's axial tilt is farthest away from the sun at its maximum of 23° 26'. Though the winter solstice lasts only a moment in time, the term is also a turning point to midwinter or the first day of winter to refer to the day on which it occurs. More evident to those in high latitudes, this occurs on the shortest day and longest night, when the sun's daily maximum position in the sky is the lowest.

The winter solstice occurs exactly when the Earth's axial tilt is farthest away from the sun at its maximum of 23° 26'. Though the winter solstice lasts only a moment in time, the term is also a turning point to midwinter or the first day of winter to refer to the day on which it occurs. More evident to those in high latitudes, this occurs on the shortest day and longest night, when the sun's daily maximum position in the sky is the lowest.

thisisbossi  2015 06 23 - 9195-9223 - DC - Stormy Sunset  I can't help but think of Tolkien looking at this photo...   Shortly after a pretty nasty storm rolled through DC, passing by just as the sun set. This is a complete 360° cylindrical panorama created from 29 photos. The sunset to the west-northwest is countered by the black clouds of doom to the east-southeast.

thisisbossi 2015 06 23 - 9195-9223 - DC - Stormy Sunset I can't help but think of Tolkien looking at this photo... Shortly after a pretty nasty storm rolled through DC, passing by just as the sun set. This is a complete 360° cylindrical panorama created from 29 photos. The sunset to the west-northwest is countered by the black clouds of doom to the east-southeast.

Snow.  In July.  Oh hell no....

Snow. In July. Oh hell no....

"For two weeks in February, the setting sun striking the waterfall creates a deep orange glow that resembles Yosemite's historic 'Firefall'."

"For two weeks in February, the setting sun striking the waterfall creates a deep orange glow that resembles Yosemite's historic 'Firefall'."

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