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Enjoy Five Puzzles Posed in "Let the Games Continue," a celebration of Martin Gardner's legacy

Enjoy Five Puzzles Posed in "Let the Games Continue," a celebration of Martin Gardner's legacy

How can a 4 piece puzzle be so difficult??. All you have to do is insert them into the frame… It is a Stewart Coffin design (#217) originally called “Four Fit” but renamed by Stewart after Martin Gardner’s week long efforts to solve it were in vain. Martin Gardner (1914-2010) is considered the Father of Recreational Math with perhaps the greatest puzzle mind of the 20th century. Martin called it “The finest dissection puzzle of all time”. The ¼” thick pieces are precision laser cut from 4…

How can a 4 piece puzzle be so difficult??. All you have to do is insert them into the frame… It is a Stewart Coffin design (#217) originally called “Four Fit” but renamed by Stewart after Martin Gardner’s week long efforts to solve it were in vain. Martin Gardner (1914-2010) is considered the Father of Recreational Math with perhaps the greatest puzzle mind of the 20th century. Martin called it “The finest dissection puzzle of all time”. The ¼” thick pieces are precision laser cut from 4…

The Nature of Things / Martin Gardner by Wagner Brenner. David Suzukis The Nature of Things featured an entire piece on Gardner, from his math buddies to the sleight-of-hand circles he frequented. Martin Gardner (born October 21, 1914[1], Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American mathematics and science writer specializing in recreational mathematics, but with interests encompassing micromagic, stage magic, pseudoscience, literature (especially the writings of Lewis Carroll), philosophy, scientific…

The Nature of Things / Martin Gardner by Wagner Brenner. David Suzukis The Nature of Things featured an entire piece on Gardner, from his math buddies to the sleight-of-hand circles he frequented. Martin Gardner (born October 21, 1914[1], Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American mathematics and science writer specializing in recreational mathematics, but with interests encompassing micromagic, stage magic, pseudoscience, literature (especially the writings of Lewis Carroll), philosophy, scientific…

October 21 is the anniversary of Martin Gardner’s birth. Gardner (1914-2010) is a legend in recreational (and professional) mathematics circles. Although he had little mathematical training, his 1956-1981 Scientific American column “Mathematical Games” has had a huge impact on the way people view math.

October 21 is the anniversary of Martin Gardner’s birth. Gardner (1914-2010) is a legend in recreational (and professional) mathematics circles. Although he had little mathematical training, his 1956-1981 Scientific American column “Mathematical Games” has had a huge impact on the way people view math.

Three puzzles from Martin Gardner (1914-2010)

Three puzzles from Martin Gardner (1914-2010)

Card Colm is a bimonthly column sponsored by the Mathematical Association of America. Find more columns here.    This column explores mathematical card principles and effects for fun, very much inspired by the extensive writings of Martin Gardner (1914-2010) on the subject, going back to his seminal Mathematics, Magic and Mystery (1956).

Card Colm is a bimonthly column sponsored by the Mathematical Association of America. Find more columns here. This column explores mathematical card principles and effects for fun, very much inspired by the extensive writings of Martin Gardner (1914-2010) on the subject, going back to his seminal Mathematics, Magic and Mystery (1956).

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