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Stairway of the Charles M. Schwab mansion, 1901.  All gone now, torn down to build a cheap apartment building...what a shame.

Stairway of the Charles M. Schwab mansion, 1901. All gone now, torn down to build a cheap apartment building...what a shame.

William A. Hall mansion 1901, 1008 5th Avenue built for Director of the Publishers’ Paper Co.  Beaux Arts style. Designed by Alexander Welch of Welch, Smith and Provot.

William A. Hall mansion 1901, 1008 5th Avenue built for Director of the Publishers’ Paper Co. Beaux Arts style. Designed by Alexander Welch of Welch, Smith and Provot.

Joseph De Lamar's Beaux-Arts mansion at Madison Avenue and 37th Street is now the property of the Consulate General of The Republic of Poland. One of the most opulent gilded age mansions surviving in New York City, the stone residence was designed in 1902 by Charles Pierrepont Henry Gilbert (1860-1952), a society architect whose stock in trade was extravagant private mansions; his list of clients included the Woolworths.

Joseph De Lamar's Beaux-Arts mansion at Madison Avenue and 37th Street is now the property of the Consulate General of The Republic of Poland. One of the most opulent gilded age mansions surviving in New York City, the stone residence was designed in 1902 by Charles Pierrepont Henry Gilbert (1860-1952), a society architect whose stock in trade was extravagant private mansions; his list of clients included the Woolworths.

The Brokaw Mansion used to stand at the corner of 79th and Fifth, but 50 years ago, demolition started. Built by Isaac Vail Brokaw, a clothing merchant with a rags-to-riches life story, the turreted home was modeled after a 16th-century Loire Valley chateau, even though it was completed in 1890. The outcry over the impending demolition made headlines. Though the mansion wasn't saved, it helped spark the passage of New York City's landmarks law, which preserves historic buildings to this day.

50 Years Ago Today, This Grand Mansion Met a Wrecking Ball

The Brokaw Mansion used to stand at the corner of 79th and Fifth, but 50 years ago, demolition started. Built by Isaac Vail Brokaw, a clothing merchant with a rags-to-riches life story, the turreted home was modeled after a 16th-century Loire Valley chateau, even though it was completed in 1890. The outcry over the impending demolition made headlines. Though the mansion wasn't saved, it helped spark the passage of New York City's landmarks law, which preserves historic buildings to this day.

Daytonian in Manhattan: The 1899 Fabbri Mansion -- No. 11 East 62nd Street

Daytonian in Manhattan: The 1899 Fabbri Mansion -- No. 11 East 62nd Street

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