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Brian Patrick Lamb [2] is an American journalist and the founder, executive chairman, and now retired CEO of C-SPAN; an American cable network which provides coverage of the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate as well as other public affairs events. Prior to launching C-SPAN in 1979, Lamb held various communications roles including White House telecommunications policy staffer and Washington bureau chief for Cablevision magazine. He also served as a commissioned officer in the…

C-SPAN , an acronym for Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network, is an American cable and satellite television network that was created in 1979 by the cable television industry as a public service. C-SPAN televises many proceedings of the United States federal government, as well as other public affairs programming. The C-SPAN network includes three television channels , one radio station and a group of websites that provide streaming media and archives of C-SPAN programs. C-SPAN's…

Sen. Robert Byrd (right), C-SPAN's founder Brian Lamb (left) and Paul FitzPatrick flip the switch for C-SPAN2 on June 2, 1986. FitzPatrick was C-SPAN president at the time.

JOHN GRISHAM (1955- ) Writer of Legal Thrillers, Attorney, Politician, Activist | Drew Rossetti's "Google" Blog

WETA-TV virtual channel 26 is a non-commercial educational PBS member television station licensed to and broadcasting from the capital city of Washington, District of Columbia, United States. The station is owned by the Greater Washington Educational Telecommunications Association, alongside sister radio outlet and NPR member station WETA . WETA-TV's studios are located in nearby Arlington, Virginia,[2] and its transmitter is located in the Tenleytown neighborhood on the northwest side of…

The 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that saw extensive service in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The regiment was one of the first official African-American units in the United States during the Civil War.[1] Many African-Americans also had fought in the American Revolution and the War of 1812 on both sides.

The New York Times is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 117 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization.[5][6][7]

The Thomas Crown Affair is a 1968 film directed and produced by Norman Jewison starring Steve McQueen and Faye Dunaway. This heist film was nominated for two Academy Awards, winning Best Original Song for Michel Legrand's "Windmills of Your Mind". A remake was released in 1999.

The internment of Japanese Americans in the United States was the forced relocation and incarceration during World War II of between 110,000 and 120,000[2] people of Japanese ancestry who lived on the Pacific coast in camps in the interior of the country. Sixty-two percent of the internees were United States citizens.[3][4] President Franklin D. Roosevelt ordered the incarceration shortly after Imperial Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor.[5]