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I collect unusual serving pieces that had one job only, like a pickle fork or a fish fork, grape shears. These are beautiful!

I collect unusual serving pieces that had one job only, like a pickle fork or a fish fork, grape shears. These are beautiful!

Ignaz Joseph Würth (1742-1792), Austrian, Wine Cooler, Vienna, 1781 Silver Overall: 11 15/16 x 9 7/8 in. (30.3 x 25.1 cm),   The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen, Foundation Gift, 2002

Ignaz Joseph Würth (1742-1792), Austrian, Wine Cooler, Vienna, 1781 Silver Overall: 11 15/16 x 9 7/8 in. (30.3 x 25.1 cm), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen, Foundation Gift, 2002

Strangeness and fantasy: notes on nineteenth-century Venetian glass at the National Gallery of Victoria | NGV

Strangeness and fantasy: notes on nineteenth-century Venetian glass at the National Gallery of Victoria | NGV

A wine cooler or ice pail for a single bottle was a French refinement for more informal dining in smaller numbers. Introduced into England in the early 18th century, it was filled with ice to chill the wine before serving. By the early 19th century, these individual wine coolers were beginning to be left on the table as part of the dressing of very grand dinners. Paul Storr, Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, 1810-11.

A wine cooler or ice pail for a single bottle was a French refinement for more informal dining in smaller numbers. Introduced into England in the early 18th century, it was filled with ice to chill the wine before serving. By the early 19th century, these individual wine coolers were beginning to be left on the table as part of the dressing of very grand dinners. Paul Storr, Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, 1810-11.

Wine Cooler by Paul de Lamerie, 1749. Victoria & Albert Museum.The style of this wine cooler, one of a pair, reflects the late use of some familiar motifs from de Lamerie's workshop. However silver marked by de Lamerie in the years before his death in 1751 is not as stylistically cohesive as his earlier work, raising the possibility that he was retailing wares from a broader range of makers.

Wine Cooler by Paul de Lamerie, 1749. Victoria & Albert Museum.The style of this wine cooler, one of a pair, reflects the late use of some familiar motifs from de Lamerie's workshop. However silver marked by de Lamerie in the years before his death in 1751 is not as stylistically cohesive as his earlier work, raising the possibility that he was retailing wares from a broader range of makers.

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