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Linda Sax on women in STEM (mostly CS)

Linda Sax on women in STEM (mostly CS)

3 Ways to Be An Ally to Women in STEM--hilarious, disturbing, and true observations on what women experience in the academy.

3 Ways to Be An Ally to Women in STEM--hilarious, disturbing, and true observations on what women experience in the academy.

Women in Science Wednesday! Mechanical engineer Alfred E. Gibson (b. 1883?) and his wife (unknown!) received an award from the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation recognizing their scientific contributions to arc welding. #Groundbreaker

Women in Science Wednesday! Mechanical engineer Alfred E. Gibson (b. 1883?) and his wife (unknown!) received an award from the James F. Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation recognizing their scientific contributions to arc welding. #Groundbreaker

Women in science presentation - A look at some of the achievements by women in the field of science.

Women in science presentation - A look at some of the achievements by women in the field of science.

Judith Aston Because of her innovative ideas and theory about the human body in motion, Judith Aston has been called "a living legend" in her time. She is widely recognized as a pioneer in the art and science of human movement, called kinetics.  #Judith Aston  >> Big Tree School of Natural Healing

Judith Aston Because of her innovative ideas and theory about the human body in motion, Judith Aston has been called "a living legend" in her time. She is widely recognized as a pioneer in the art and science of human movement, called kinetics. #Judith Aston >> Big Tree School of Natural Healing

Women in Science Wednesday! Regina Flannery Herzfeld (1904-2004) was one of the first female anthropologists in the United States. #Groundbreaker

Women in Science Wednesday! Regina Flannery Herzfeld (1904-2004) was one of the first female anthropologists in the United States. #Groundbreaker

In 1948, Elizabeth Lee Hazen and Rachel Fuller Brown teamed up to develop nystatin, the first non-toxic drug treatment for fungal infections in humans. Hazen and Brown were doing research for the Division of Laboratories and Research of the New York State Department of Health, when Hazen found a promising micro-organism in the soil of a friend's dairy farm. She named it Streptomyces noursei, after William Nourse, the farm's owner.

In 1948, Elizabeth Lee Hazen and Rachel Fuller Brown teamed up to develop nystatin, the first non-toxic drug treatment for fungal infections in humans. Hazen and Brown were doing research for the Division of Laboratories and Research of the New York State Department of Health, when Hazen found a promising micro-organism in the soil of a friend's dairy farm. She named it Streptomyces noursei, after William Nourse, the farm's owner.

The Blog: Grandma Got Stem, features articles written about great women in STEM careers throughout history :)

The Blog: Grandma Got Stem, features articles written about great women in STEM careers throughout history :)

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