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Sea In The Glass #art, #sea, #ships, https://facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=106186096099420

Sea In The Glass #art, #sea, #ships, https://facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=106186096099420

This image uses the emphasis as a principle of design, more specifically due to the use of contrast and depth. The contrast of this photo allows the coffee cup to pop while also drawing emphasis to the forest setting arising out of the cup. The lighting of this image allows for a play off of the steam/mist arising out of the cup which makes it even more appealing. The depth of this image also contributes to emphasis as the focus is sharpe and the small details are made clear.

This image uses the emphasis as a principle of design, more specifically due to the use of contrast and depth. The contrast of this photo allows the coffee cup to pop while also drawing emphasis to the forest setting arising out of the cup. The lighting of this image allows for a play off of the steam/mist arising out of the cup which makes it even more appealing. The depth of this image also contributes to emphasis as the focus is sharpe and the small details are made clear.

Dan Mountford captura assuntos distintos de uma forma bonita, e dá vida a novas imagens de forma surreal e única por meio da sobreposição analógica das imagens.

Dan Mountford captura assuntos distintos de uma forma bonita, e dá vida a novas imagens de forma surreal e única por meio da sobreposição analógica das imagens.

"Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." (Act 1, Scene 3) - This quote demonstrates Macbeth's ability to dismiss his violent thoughts that seem to bother him. Through this line, Macbeth is trying to say that no matter what happens, even the worst of days will come to an end, so he should stop worrying about what will happen, and let nature run its course.

"Come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day." (Act 1, Scene 3) - This quote demonstrates Macbeth's ability to dismiss his violent thoughts that seem to bother him. Through this line, Macbeth is trying to say that no matter what happens, even the worst of days will come to an end, so he should stop worrying about what will happen, and let nature run its course.

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