Explore Edward Curtis, Geronimo and more!

Explore related topics

Edward S. Curtis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edward S. Curtis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

(2) Yahnosha (1865-c. 1954). Four of his children died in captivity at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Another two lived to see the end of the Apache exile and moved to Mescalero Reservation in New Mexico with their parents, in 1913. Their last child was born shortly after they returned to New Mexico.

(2) Yahnosha (1865-c. 1954). Four of his children died in captivity at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Another two lived to see the end of the Apache exile and moved to Mescalero Reservation in New Mexico with their parents, in 1913. Their last child was born shortly after they returned to New Mexico.

MyWay

MyWay

MyWay

MyWay

MyWay

MyWay

SÍGĔSH – Apache, 1904, photogravure by Edward S. Curtis, from the permanent collections of Arizona State Museum.

SÍGĔSH – Apache, 1904, photogravure by Edward S. Curtis, from the permanent collections of Arizona State Museum.

Qahatika Girl (1908)  Forty miles due south of the Pima reservation, which is present-day Arizona, in five small villages lived the true desert Indian, the Qahatika, They fled to the barren desert after being defeated by the Apache tribe. When asked why they do not live in river valleys, where they could live in plenty, their answer was that their home is the best; that they do not have the river sickness as do the River Indians.

Qahatika Girl (1908) Forty miles due south of the Pima reservation, which is present-day Arizona, in five small villages lived the true desert Indian, the Qahatika, They fled to the barren desert after being defeated by the Apache tribe. When asked why they do not live in river valleys, where they could live in plenty, their answer was that their home is the best; that they do not have the river sickness as do the River Indians.

Edward S. Curtis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Edward S. Curtis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

MyWay

MyWay

Pinterest
Search