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http://cs11509.vkontakte.ru/u786597/101904882/x_9a5c8a0f.jpg

Viking toiletries. In many movies and cartoons, the Vikings are shown as dirty, wild-looking, savage men and women, but in reality, the Vikings were quite vain about their appearance. In fact, combs, tweezers, razors and “ear spoons” are among some of the most frequent artifacts from Viking Age excavations. These same excavations have also shown that the Vikings made soap.:

Viking toiletries. In many movies and cartoons, the Vikings are shown as dirty, wild-looking, savage men and women, but in reality, the Vikings were quite vain about their appearance. In fact, combs, tweezers, razors and “ear spoons” are among some of the most frequent artifacts from Viking Age excavations. These same excavations have also shown that the Vikings made soap.:

Viking Bronze Amulets, c. 800-1000 AD,   http://petitepointplace.tumblr.com/image/126103377734

Viking Bronze Amulets, c. 800-1000 AD, http://petitepointplace.tumblr.com/image/126103377734

Birka Traders: Viking Tweezers, 10th century, Birka, 900-1000AD Working tweezers, complete with suspension loop. Waller's Type 31, with anthropomorphic head. Length approx. 9.5 cm, not including loop. Iron arms, brass grip/head.

Birka Traders: Viking Tweezers, 10th century, Birka, 900-1000AD Working tweezers, complete with suspension loop. Waller's Type 31, with anthropomorphic head. Length approx. 9.5 cm, not including loop. Iron arms, brass grip/head.

Viking 10th century silver pin with polyhedral-shaped head, slip-knot ring, and attached chain that is a unique find from Ireland. Another pin was originally attached to the now empty ring on the other end of the chain to form a pair of pins. Paired and chain-linked pins were made in Scandinavia and have been found in Swedish Viking burials. This pin came from an Irish crannog (lake-dwelling) of a regional Irish king. It was imported to Ireland through trade, marriage, or raiding.

Viking 10th century silver pin with polyhedral-shaped head, slip-knot ring, and attached chain that is a unique find from Ireland. Another pin was originally attached to the now empty ring on the other end of the chain to form a pair of pins. Paired and chain-linked pins were made in Scandinavia and have been found in Swedish Viking burials. This pin came from an Irish crannog (lake-dwelling) of a regional Irish king. It was imported to Ireland through trade, marriage, or raiding.

Anhänger aus Gold mit Filigranarbeiten, Museum Haithabu

Anhänger aus Gold mit Filigranarbeiten, Museum Haithabu

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