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Hannah Hoch distorts images to reacreate a picture, in this piece there is minimal colour and I like the distortion of the faces

Hannah Hoch distorts images to reacreate a picture, in this piece there is minimal colour and I like the distortion of the faces

This wud be funny if this was another form of 'planking' or old school kungfu fitness: Erwin Wurm; "One minute sculptures"

This wud be funny if this was another form of 'planking' or old school kungfu fitness: Erwin Wurm; "One minute sculptures"

Anna Hepler: Pictured here is The Great Haul made from sewn sheet plastic and tarps hanging 22 feet from the clerestory. It looks like glass, but it's plastic.  It was in a show at the Portland Museum of Art, in Portland, Maine in 2010. There were 2 large sculptural installations (the Great Haul and Full Blown)

Anna Hepler: Pictured here is The Great Haul made from sewn sheet plastic and tarps hanging 22 feet from the clerestory. It looks like glass, but it's plastic. It was in a show at the Portland Museum of Art, in Portland, Maine in 2010. There were 2 large sculptural installations (the Great Haul and Full Blown)

A motorcycle woman with leather jacket, circa year 1949 - This is such an evocative picture

A motorcycle woman with leather jacket, circa year 1949 - This is such an evocative picture

Plastic Ocean by artist-illustrator Tan Zi Xi.  More than 20,000 pieces of discarded plastic - from water bottles and drinking straws to cling film and plastic bags - have found their way into a gallery at the Singapore Art Museum. Painstakingly collected, cleaned and artfully composed in a room by artist-illustrator Tan Zi Xi, the immersive installation is meant to evoke in the audience a sense of being submerged in a sea of swirling trash.

Plastic Ocean by artist-illustrator Tan Zi Xi. More than 20,000 pieces of discarded plastic - from water bottles and drinking straws to cling film and plastic bags - have found their way into a gallery at the Singapore Art Museum. Painstakingly collected, cleaned and artfully composed in a room by artist-illustrator Tan Zi Xi, the immersive installation is meant to evoke in the audience a sense of being submerged in a sea of swirling trash.

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