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Yasuaki Kakehi, 2012

Yasuaki Kakehi, 2012

Aram Bartholl, "0,16", 2009, an illuminated installation of paper covered cubes that appear pixelated when a person casts a shadow, 35x100x280 cm.

Aram Bartholl, "0,16", 2009, an illuminated installation of paper covered cubes that appear pixelated when a person casts a shadow, 35x100x280 cm.

Rainbow Church by Tokujin Yoshioka Tokujin Yoshioka'a Rainbow Church, 26 ft high installation made of 500 crystal prisms. “I experienced a space filled with the light of Matisse: Being bathed in the sunlight of the Provence, the stained glass with Matisse’s vibrant colors suffused the room with full of colors. Since then, I had been dreaming of designing an architecture where people can feel the light with all senses."

Rainbow Church by Tokujin Yoshioka Tokujin Yoshioka'a Rainbow Church, 26 ft high installation made of 500 crystal prisms. “I experienced a space filled with the light of Matisse: Being bathed in the sunlight of the Provence, the stained glass with Matisse’s vibrant colors suffused the room with full of colors. Since then, I had been dreaming of designing an architecture where people can feel the light with all senses."

Synthesis by Tom Price | http://www.yellowtrace.com.au/tom-price-synthesis/

Synthesis Resin & Tar Sculptures by Tom Price

Synthesis by Tom Price | http://www.yellowtrace.com.au/tom-price-synthesis/

.:* L - In his installation, reverse of volume RG, Yasuaki Onishi uses the simplest materials - plastic sheeting and black hot glue - to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. The process that he calls “casting the invisible” involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. This process of reversing sculpture is Onishi’s meditation on the nature of the negative space, or void, left…

.:* L - In his installation, reverse of volume RG, Yasuaki Onishi uses the simplest materials - plastic sheeting and black hot glue - to create a monumental, mountainous form that appears to float in space. The process that he calls “casting the invisible” involves draping the plastic sheeting over stacked cardboard boxes, which are then removed to leave only their impressions. This process of reversing sculpture is Onishi’s meditation on the nature of the negative space, or void, left…

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