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'One Day at a Time' (1975-84)  Like many '70s series under Norman Lear's production umbrella, "One Day at a Time" was more dramedy that straight sitcom, and in this instance, its lead was Ann, who had packed up her two sassy teenage daughters and moved to Indianapolis after divorcing her controlling husband. She'd been married at 17, and hadn't held a job outside the house since. While she certainly wasn't TV's first divorcee, single mom, or working mom, Ann was one of primetime's most…

The 10 Most Television-ary Female Characters in Primetime History

'One Day at a Time' (1975-84) Like many '70s series under Norman Lear's production umbrella, "One Day at a Time" was more dramedy that straight sitcom, and in this instance, its lead was Ann, who had packed up her two sassy teenage daughters and moved to Indianapolis after divorcing her controlling husband. She'd been married at 17, and hadn't held a job outside the house since. While she certainly wasn't TV's first divorcee, single mom, or working mom, Ann was one of primetime's most…

TV Guide April 6, 1974 - Carroll O'Connor, Norman Lear, Bill Macy and Redd Foxx. Illustration by Jack Davis.

TV Guide April 6, 1974 - Carroll O'Connor, Norman Lear, Bill Macy and Redd Foxx. Illustration by Jack Davis.

O'Connor, Carroll: with Stapleton in Lear's "All in the Family ...

O'Connor, Carroll: with Stapleton in Lear's "All in the Family ...

Carol O'Connor - To this day, I can watch All in the Family and, laugh at Archie Bunker and his view of the world.  Norman Lear is largely responsible here, so props to him, but Carol O'Connor brought television comedies GREATEST character to life in a way no other character has been portrayed before or since.  Mr. O'Connor completes my set of bishops on my chess board of people who make me laugh.  He is also a link to past comedians who I respect but didn't grow up with (Buttons, Silvers…

Carol O'Connor - To this day, I can watch All in the Family and, laugh at Archie Bunker and his view of the world. Norman Lear is largely responsible here, so props to him, but Carol O'Connor brought television comedies GREATEST character to life in a way no other character has been portrayed before or since. Mr. O'Connor completes my set of bishops on my chess board of people who make me laugh. He is also a link to past comedians who I respect but didn't grow up with (Buttons, Silvers…

Bea Arthur (center) starred with Adrienne Barbeau (left) and Rue McClanahan in the socially controversial '70s TV show Maude, a spin-off of All in the Family that Lear also created, developed and produced.

Bea Arthur (center) starred with Adrienne Barbeau (left) and Rue McClanahan in the socially controversial '70s TV show Maude, a spin-off of All in the Family that Lear also created, developed and produced.

Cast of All in the Family.  Considered "the most controversial, groundbreaking show of the 70's," this sitcom ran from 1971-1979.  Archie Bunker's chair is now housed in the Smithsonian Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

Cast of All in the Family. Considered "the most controversial, groundbreaking show of the 70's," this sitcom ran from 1971-1979. Archie Bunker's chair is now housed in the Smithsonian Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

39 years ago today, the final episode of Sanford and Son aired. It ran on the NBC television network from January 14, 1972 to March 25, 1977. It was originally based on the BBC's Steptoe and Son. Known for its edgy racial humor, running gags and catch phrases, the series was adapted by Norman Lear and considered NBC's answer to CBS's All in the Family. Sanford and Son has been hailed as the precursor to many other African American sitcoms. It was a ratings hit throughout its six-season run.

39 years ago today, the final episode of Sanford and Son aired. It ran on the NBC television network from January 14, 1972 to March 25, 1977. It was originally based on the BBC's Steptoe and Son. Known for its edgy racial humor, running gags and catch phrases, the series was adapted by Norman Lear and considered NBC's answer to CBS's All in the Family. Sanford and Son has been hailed as the precursor to many other African American sitcoms. It was a ratings hit throughout its six-season run.

Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman is an American soap opera parody that aired in daily (weekday) syndication from January 1976 to May 1977. The series was produced by Norman Lear, directed by Joan Darling and Jim Drake, and starred Louise Lasser.

Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman is an American soap opera parody that aired in daily (weekday) syndication from January 1976 to May 1977. The series was produced by Norman Lear, directed by Joan Darling and Jim Drake, and starred Louise Lasser.

Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman! What a crazy show - I am going to see if there are any shows on google

Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman! What a crazy show - I am going to see if there are any shows on google

"Sanford and Son"

Norman Lear On The Nature Of Belly Laughs, The Stories All Around You, And Shaping TV As We Know It

Loved it, hated it then finally loved it...watched at different ages.

Loved it, hated it then finally loved it...watched at different ages.