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My Escape from Slavery. [The Century; a popular quarterly. / Volume 23, Issue 1, Nov 1881]  AUTHOR Frederick Douglass  Page(s) 125  View the page images (at Cornell University)  View text (generated by OCR without correction) [More about text]  Browse this issue  Search or browse The Century; a popular quarterly

My Escape from Slavery. [The Century; a popular quarterly. / Volume 23, Issue 1, Nov 1881] AUTHOR Frederick Douglass Page(s) 125 View the page images (at Cornell University) View text (generated by OCR without correction) [More about text] Browse this issue Search or browse The Century; a popular quarterly

Next time you pick up your clothes from the cleaners, remember Thomas L. Jennings, first brother to receive a patent: for dry cleaning process

Next time you pick up your clothes from the cleaners, remember Thomas L. Jennings, first brother to receive a patent: for dry cleaning process

"The Underground Railroad of the Firelands," an address by the Hon. Rush Sloane from the July 1888 issue of the Firelands Pioneer.

"The Underground Railroad of the Firelands," an address by the Hon. Rush Sloane from the July 1888 issue of the Firelands Pioneer.

To escape slavery, light-skinned Ellen Craft disguised herself as a male slaveholder. Her husband, William, who was darker skinned, posed as her slave valet. They successfully traveled to the North, and eventually to England, where they published a narrative recounting their lives as slaves and their daring escape:  Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (1860).

To escape slavery, light-skinned Ellen Craft disguised herself as a male slaveholder. Her husband, William, who was darker skinned, posed as her slave valet. They successfully traveled to the North, and eventually to England, where they published a narrative recounting their lives as slaves and their daring escape: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom: The Escape of William and Ellen Craft from Slavery (1860).

AARON was only six years old when he was bought by (President) Andrew Jackson in 1791 and HANNAH was less than twelve years old when purchased in 1794.   Hannah was Rachel Jackson’s “personal companion” and later became head of the “house servants.” Aaron was trained as a blacksmith, an important position on the plantation.  Hannah and Aaron married around 1820 and raised ten children.  They took the surname “Jackson” following Emancipation.

AARON was only six years old when he was bought by (President) Andrew Jackson in 1791 and HANNAH was less than twelve years old when purchased in 1794. Hannah was Rachel Jackson’s “personal companion” and later became head of the “house servants.” Aaron was trained as a blacksmith, an important position on the plantation. Hannah and Aaron married around 1820 and raised ten children. They took the surname “Jackson” following Emancipation.

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