Interpretative monument at Redoubt No. 4 erected by theTennessee Historical Society.  Redoubt No. 4  The First Redoubt To Fall  On December 2, 1864, Gen. John Bell Hood brought his war-weary troops to Nashville, following their withering frontal attack at Franklin, Tennessee on November 30.  His army, then numbering less than 25,000, was positioned south of Nashville with its left flank aligned along present day Woodmont Boulevard.  At the roadway that was then — as it is now — Hillsboro…

Interpretative monument at Redoubt No. 4 erected by theTennessee Historical Society. Redoubt No. 4 The First Redoubt To Fall On December 2, 1864, Gen. John Bell Hood brought his war-weary troops to Nashville, following their withering frontal attack at Franklin, Tennessee on November 30. His army, then numbering less than 25,000, was positioned south of Nashville with its left flank aligned along present day Woodmont Boulevard. At the roadway that was then — as it is now — Hillsboro…

The photo above show the remains of Redoubt 4’s earthen wall which faces north (to the left of this view) and the city of Nashville.  The Hillsboro Pike is approximately one-half mile to the east.  (Photos by Todd Lawrence)  Portions of the north wall of the last remaining redoubt, No. 4, can be seen at the top of a hill in the gated residential community of Abbotsford in South Nashville. On this high ground, Lumsden’s Battery consisting of 48 men and four smoothbore Napoleon cannons, and…

The photo above show the remains of Redoubt 4’s earthen wall which faces north (to the left of this view) and the city of Nashville. The Hillsboro Pike is approximately one-half mile to the east. (Photos by Todd Lawrence) Portions of the north wall of the last remaining redoubt, No. 4, can be seen at the top of a hill in the gated residential community of Abbotsford in South Nashville. On this high ground, Lumsden’s Battery consisting of 48 men and four smoothbore Napoleon cannons, and…

The photo above show the remains of Redoubt 4’s earthen wall which faces north (to the left of this view) and the city of Nashville.  The Hillsboro Pike is approximately one-half mile to the east.  (Photos by Todd Lawrence)  Portions of the north wall of the last remaining redoubt, No. 4, can be seen at the top of a hill in the gated residential community of Abbotsford in South Nashville. On this high ground, Lumsden’s Battery consisting of 48 men and four smoothbore Napoleon cannons, and…

The photo above show the remains of Redoubt 4’s earthen wall which faces north (to the left of this view) and the city of Nashville. The Hillsboro Pike is approximately one-half mile to the east. (Photos by Todd Lawrence) Portions of the north wall of the last remaining redoubt, No. 4, can be seen at the top of a hill in the gated residential community of Abbotsford in South Nashville. On this high ground, Lumsden’s Battery consisting of 48 men and four smoothbore Napoleon cannons, and…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

The view of the photo above is westerly toward present day Estes Road, where 24 U.S. cannons pounded the Redoubt from approximately 11:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on December 15, 1864. (Photos by Todd Lawrence)  At the time of the December 15 battle, extremely harsh winter conditions had prevented completion of the Redoubt No. 4. Even now, however, nearly 150 years later, the massive amount of work accomplished by hand in frozen ground is plainly visible at this small remaining portion of the…

The view of the photo above is westerly toward present day Estes Road, where 24 U.S. cannons pounded the Redoubt from approximately 11:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on December 15, 1864. (Photos by Todd Lawrence) At the time of the December 15 battle, extremely harsh winter conditions had prevented completion of the Redoubt No. 4. Even now, however, nearly 150 years later, the massive amount of work accomplished by hand in frozen ground is plainly visible at this small remaining portion of the…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Redoubt No. 1 was one of five redoubts built by Hood’s Confederate Army as it occupied the countryside south of Nashville in December 1864. These small earthen forts were commonly built early in the War to give the ‘citizen soldiers’ a sense of security. The forts became a common feature of trench works later during the War. On the first day of the Battle of Nashville, December 15, the U.S. Army attacked all five forts. Redoubt No. 1 was the last to fall. This redoubt is one of the last…

Lumsden's Alabama Battery at Redoubt #4 at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee.

Lumsden's Alabama Battery at Redoubt #4 at the Battle of Nashville, Tennessee.

The view of the photo above is westerly toward present day Estes Road, where 24 U.S. cannons pounded the Redoubt from approximately 11:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on December 15, 1864. (Photos by Todd Lawrence)  At the time of the December 15 battle, extremely harsh winter conditions had prevented completion of the Redoubt No. 4. Even now, however, nearly 150 years later, the massive amount of work accomplished by hand in frozen ground is plainly visible at this small remaining portion of the…

The view of the photo above is westerly toward present day Estes Road, where 24 U.S. cannons pounded the Redoubt from approximately 11:00 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. on December 15, 1864. (Photos by Todd Lawrence) At the time of the December 15 battle, extremely harsh winter conditions had prevented completion of the Redoubt No. 4. Even now, however, nearly 150 years later, the massive amount of work accomplished by hand in frozen ground is plainly visible at this small remaining portion of the…

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