This reentered space debris was originally a Star 48B rocket motor casing, the upper stage of the Delta II rocket that launched GPS IIR-6 from Cape Canaveral AFS on 10 November 2000. The motor casing separated from the spacecraft after deployment and reentered the atmosphere on 13 January 2005, falling to earth near Bangkok, Thailand.  The U.S. Air Force subsequently recovered the debris.

This reentered space debris was originally a Star 48B rocket motor casing, the upper stage of the Delta II rocket that launched GPS IIR-6 from Cape Canaveral AFS on 10 November 2000. The motor casing separated from the spacecraft after deployment and reentered the atmosphere on 13 January 2005, falling to earth near Bangkok, Thailand. The U.S. Air Force subsequently recovered the debris.

In May 1989 the United States Air Force and the National Space Club initiated  unofficially the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Award. In 1997 the  award was formalized into an official Air Force award. The four former SMC leaders in the exhibits below from left to right, Maj General Ben Funk, Brig General  William G  King Jr. , Lt General Charles H. Terhune, and Lt General Kenneth W. Schultz have  been honored with induction as Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers.

In May 1989 the United States Air Force and the National Space Club initiated unofficially the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Award. In 1997 the award was formalized into an official Air Force award. The four former SMC leaders in the exhibits below from left to right, Maj General Ben Funk, Brig General William G King Jr. , Lt General Charles H. Terhune, and Lt General Kenneth W. Schultz have been honored with induction as Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers.

This Room features experiments from the Space Test Program Exhibit which was  originally located out in the main ground floor Lobby of our building. The one item not  covered in the above slides is the space shuttle tile on exhibit, pictured below.  This tile  was part of the thermal protection system allowing the Space Shuttle to withstand the heat  of re-entry to return the STP experiments to earth for examination.

This Room features experiments from the Space Test Program Exhibit which was originally located out in the main ground floor Lobby of our building. The one item not covered in the above slides is the space shuttle tile on exhibit, pictured below. This tile was part of the thermal protection system allowing the Space Shuttle to withstand the heat of re-entry to return the STP experiments to earth for examination.

The recovery of Discoverer 13 made worldwide news, and on 15 August 1960 Gen  Thomas White (Air Force Chief of Staff) brought the capsule to President  Eisenhower in the White House, seen in the background photograph. The capsule  displayed here is a recovery capsule from a General Electric Mark 2 re-entry vehicle.   The capsule was generously donated to the Space and Missile Systems Center  Heritage Center by Major General John E. Kulpa (ret.) in the spring of 2009.

The recovery of Discoverer 13 made worldwide news, and on 15 August 1960 Gen Thomas White (Air Force Chief of Staff) brought the capsule to President Eisenhower in the White House, seen in the background photograph. The capsule displayed here is a recovery capsule from a General Electric Mark 2 re-entry vehicle. The capsule was generously donated to the Space and Missile Systems Center Heritage Center by Major General John E. Kulpa (ret.) in the spring of 2009.

The Missile Defense Room features displays from the Strategic Defense Initiative,  Space Based Laser, and Defense Support Program which were originally located in  the ground floor main lobby, and are covered in the above slides.  They  are now located in the new dedicated SMC Heritage Center.

The Missile Defense Room features displays from the Strategic Defense Initiative, Space Based Laser, and Defense Support Program which were originally located in the ground floor main lobby, and are covered in the above slides. They are now located in the new dedicated SMC Heritage Center.

CAPE is a unique STP artifact.  It was flown three times in the post space shuttle  Columbia era.  Two ANDE missions (low-Earth orbit by monitoring total  atmospheric density at 400 kilometers) were flown by CAPE, two picosat missions,  and it held one experiment by AFIT that tested inflatable structures.  It is on display  in the Lobby of Bldg 271.

CAPE is a unique STP artifact. It was flown three times in the post space shuttle Columbia era. Two ANDE missions (low-Earth orbit by monitoring total atmospheric density at 400 kilometers) were flown by CAPE, two picosat missions, and it held one experiment by AFIT that tested inflatable structures. It is on display in the Lobby of Bldg 271.

The Launch Vehicles Room features the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles  exhibit highlighting its history to develop a single family of launch vehicle systems,  based on a common core supplemented by strap-on solids that would meet the U.S.  Air Force, NRO, NASA and commercial missions and lower the cost of launch  systems to the nation.  Also on display, Titan missile and launch vehicle history.

The Launch Vehicles Room features the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles exhibit highlighting its history to develop a single family of launch vehicle systems, based on a common core supplemented by strap-on solids that would meet the U.S. Air Force, NRO, NASA and commercial missions and lower the cost of launch systems to the nation. Also on display, Titan missile and launch vehicle history.

This display features STP mission artifacts, the WINDEX video camera system,  M88-1,   both missions to see the utility of the military man in space program, RME III, which  was radiation monitoring equipment for the safety of the Space Shuttle crew and  REBR, which attaches itself to serves as a “black box” for de-orbiting satellites, to  record the breakup of those satellites in earth orbit.

This display features STP mission artifacts, the WINDEX video camera system, M88-1, both missions to see the utility of the military man in space program, RME III, which was radiation monitoring equipment for the safety of the Space Shuttle crew and REBR, which attaches itself to serves as a “black box” for de-orbiting satellites, to record the breakup of those satellites in earth orbit.

The mission of SMC's Heritage Center is to help the Center's personnel and visitors understand its history, including its material heritage, achievements, and challenges. It collects, preserves and provides information about the programs, accomplishments, and heritage of the Space and Missile Systems Center.  The Center is supported by the SMC Heritage Foundation (for donation information, please visit: http://www.smcheritagefoundation.org  )

The mission of SMC's Heritage Center is to help the Center's personnel and visitors understand its history, including its material heritage, achievements, and challenges. It collects, preserves and provides information about the programs, accomplishments, and heritage of the Space and Missile Systems Center. The Center is supported by the SMC Heritage Foundation (for donation information, please visit: http://www.smcheritagefoundation.org )

The Space Surveillance Mirror, housed within a Space Based Interceptor Lifejacket, was  part of a planned spinning optical sensor which would face the earth, continuously  turning at a precise rotation and maintaining readiness to detect and track hostile missiles.

The Space Surveillance Mirror, housed within a Space Based Interceptor Lifejacket, was part of a planned spinning optical sensor which would face the earth, continuously turning at a precise rotation and maintaining readiness to detect and track hostile missiles.

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