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Wolcott, Marion Post. Resting the mules which get too hot when the cotton is high in mid-summer cultivation; King and Anderson Plantation, near Clarksdale, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi, August 1940. Photographic prints. Digital ID: 1212147

Wolcott, Marion Post. Resting the mules which get too hot when the cotton is high in mid-summer cultivation; King and Anderson Plantation, near Clarksdale, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi, August 1940. Photographic prints. Digital ID: 1212147

New Madrid County, Missouri. Child of sharecropper cultivating cotton, 1938. Russell Lee - Photographer

New Madrid County, Missouri. Child of sharecropper cultivating cotton, 1938. Russell Lee - Photographer

The dust bowl cause many troubles for farmers and familes because live could not go on in these places with out water and the ability to grow plants in would hurt people more than we can think of today

The dust bowl cause many troubles for farmers and familes because live could not go on in these places with out water and the ability to grow plants in would hurt people more than we can think of today

The migration of African Americans to the urban industrial centers of Chicago, Detroit, New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere in the 1920s and 1930s created a new market for jazz, blues, and related genres of music, often performed by full-time musicians, either working alone or in small groups. T

The migration of African Americans to the urban industrial centers of Chicago, Detroit, New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere in the 1920s and 1930s created a new market for jazz, blues, and related genres of music, often performed by full-time musicians, either working alone or in small groups. T

The yard had a regular whipping post to which they tied the slave, and gave him "nine-and-thirty," as it was called, meaning thirty-nine lashes as hard as they could lay it on. Men were stripped of their shirts in preparation for the whipping, and women had to take off their dresses from the shoulders to the waist. These whippings were not so severe as when the slaves were stripped entirely of their clothes, as was generally the case on the plantations where slaves were owned by the dozen.

The yard had a regular whipping post to which they tied the slave, and gave him "nine-and-thirty," as it was called, meaning thirty-nine lashes as hard as they could lay it on. Men were stripped of their shirts in preparation for the whipping, and women had to take off their dresses from the shoulders to the waist. These whippings were not so severe as when the slaves were stripped entirely of their clothes, as was generally the case on the plantations where slaves were owned by the dozen.

Love against the odds: Mary's father threw her out when she decided to marry... - http://urbanangelza.com/2015/10/19/love-against-the-odds-marys-father-threw-her-out-when-she-decided-to-marry/?Urban+Angels http://www.urbanangelza.com

Love against the odds: Mary's father threw her out when she decided to marry... - http://urbanangelza.com/2015/10/19/love-against-the-odds-marys-father-threw-her-out-when-she-decided-to-marry/?Urban+Angels http://www.urbanangelza.com

Mike Disfarmer, Leo and Leon Todd  ca. 1930, Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1930  boys hold hands farmers kids rural life overalls little kids

Mike Disfarmer, Leo and Leon Todd ca. 1930, Vintage gelatin silver, printed ca. 1930 boys hold hands farmers kids rural life overalls little kids

"Yes’m, I saw some slaves sold away from the plantation, four men and two women, both of ‘em with little babies. The traders got ‘em. Sold ‘em down to Mobile, Alabama. One was my pappy’s sister. We never heard from her again. I saw a likely young feller sold for $1500… That was my Uncle Ike. Marse (Master) Jonathan Spease bought him and kep’ him the rest of his life.” - Betty Cofer, North Carolina, WPA Slave Narratives. c. 1900 Texas.

"Yes’m, I saw some slaves sold away from the plantation, four men and two women, both of ‘em with little babies. The traders got ‘em. Sold ‘em down to Mobile, Alabama. One was my pappy’s sister. We never heard from her again. I saw a likely young feller sold for $1500… That was my Uncle Ike. Marse (Master) Jonathan Spease bought him and kep’ him the rest of his life.” - Betty Cofer, North Carolina, WPA Slave Narratives. c. 1900 Texas.

Bessie Coleman - first female African American pilot. No American flight schools would take her, so she moved to France to train and live. She earned her living barnstorming and stunt flying.

Bessie Coleman - first female African American pilot. No American flight schools would take her, so she moved to France to train and live. She earned her living barnstorming and stunt flying.

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