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Apus: Bird of paradise - Bird family known for plumage - A spectacular sight.

Apus: Bird of paradise - Bird family known for plumage - A spectacular sight.

Standing out: The bright, pinkish-white star at upper left of Orion, known as the hunter, is Betelgeuse. AKA a red supergiant, Betelgeuse is in the last stages of its life; increasing in size and sending its stellar material into space at a tremendous rate. Image credit: ESO

The fiery depths of space: Astronomers capture dazzling rainbow nebula swirling round supergiant star

Standing out: The bright, pinkish-white star at upper left of Orion, known as the hunter, is Betelgeuse. AKA a red supergiant, Betelgeuse is in the last stages of its life; increasing in size and sending its stellar material into space at a tremendous rate. Image credit: ESO

#andromeda #constellation I am going to get this on my hip, but just stars, no lines

#andromeda #constellation I am going to get this on my hip, but just stars, no lines

The Pleiades - The Seven Sisters - Sterope, Merope, Electra, Maia, Taygeta, Celaeno, and Alcyone, along with their parents Atlas and Pleione.

The Pleiades - The Seven Sisters - Sterope, Merope, Electra, Maia, Taygeta, Celaeno, and Alcyone, along with their parents Atlas and Pleione.

This object is a billowing tower of cold gas and dust rising from a stellar nursery called the Eagle Nebula. 7,000 light-years distant from us, the soaring tower is 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers tall.  When Swiss astronomer Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the Eagle Nebula in the mid-eighteenth century, he only described the cluster of stars surrounding it. Charles Messier independently rediscovered it in 1764 as part of his catalog, dubbing it M16.

Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar 2008

This object is a billowing tower of cold gas and dust rising from a stellar nursery called the Eagle Nebula. 7,000 light-years distant from us, the soaring tower is 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers tall. When Swiss astronomer Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the Eagle Nebula in the mid-eighteenth century, he only described the cluster of stars surrounding it. Charles Messier independently rediscovered it in 1764 as part of his catalog, dubbing it M16.

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