Explore Prehistory, Shells and more!

Bat Green River Formation - I have dug at the Green River Formation, (Wyoming) many times....Love it!!

Bat Green River Formation - I have dug at the Green River Formation, (Wyoming) many times....Love it!!

The Woolly Mammoth exhibit at the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria. Image: Wikimedia Commons/Mammut

The Woolly Mammoth exhibit at the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria. Image: Wikimedia Commons/Mammut

Canadia spinosa is a fossil annelid or “ringed worm” about 1 to 2 inches in length. The head bore a pair of slender tentacles while the body was covered with innumerable setae or short bristles. Canadia used its limbs to both walk and swim. Sediment has never been found in the gut, suggesting that this worm may have been a carnivore or scavenger. Canadia are some of the most photogenic of the Burgess Shale fossils.

Canadia spinosa is a fossil annelid or “ringed worm” about 1 to 2 inches in length. The head bore a pair of slender tentacles while the body was covered with innumerable setae or short bristles. Canadia used its limbs to both walk and swim. Sediment has never been found in the gut, suggesting that this worm may have been a carnivore or scavenger. Canadia are some of the most photogenic of the Burgess Shale fossils.

Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513), 15 mm long. Hallucigenia was originally interpreted upside-down, with its spikes in the sediment and its appendages collecting and passing food towards its large, bulbous head. Image credit: Jean-Bernard Caron.

Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale (Royal Ontario Museum 61513), 15 mm long. Hallucigenia was originally interpreted upside-down, with its spikes in the sediment and its appendages collecting and passing food towards its large, bulbous head. Image credit: Jean-Bernard Caron.

Canadia spinosa, Cambrian annelid worm from the Burgess Shale

Canadia spinosa, Cambrian annelid worm from the Burgess Shale

New lobster-like predator found in 508 million-year-old fossil-rich site

New lobster-like predator found in 508 million-year-old fossil-rich site

Name: Elrathia kingii . Trilobite Order Ptychopariida, Family Ptychoparioidea Locality: House Range, Millard County, Utah Stratigraphy: Middle Cambrian, Wheeler Formation Remarks: Mass mortality

Name: Elrathia kingii . Trilobite Order Ptychopariida, Family Ptychoparioidea Locality: House Range, Millard County, Utah Stratigraphy: Middle Cambrian, Wheeler Formation Remarks: Mass mortality

Hallucigenia: a Burgess Shale fossil. The Burgess Shale Formation in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the world's most famous fossil fields. At 505 million years (Middle Cambrian) old, it is one of the earliest fossil beds containing exceptionally well preserved soft-part fossils.

The Strangest Cambrian Creatures Ever Discovered

Hallucigenia: a Burgess Shale fossil. The Burgess Shale Formation in the Canadian Rockies of British Columbia, is one of the world's most famous fossil fields. At 505 million years (Middle Cambrian) old, it is one of the earliest fossil beds containing exceptionally well preserved soft-part fossils.

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