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Roy DeCarava Photography | Roy DeCarava

Roy DeCarava Photography | Roy DeCarava

Roy DeCarava Romare Bearden 1951

Roy DeCarava Romare Bearden 1951

Dancer's Legs, cir. 1956 by Roy DeCarava / Gelatin silver print / DeCarava's celebrated series of images of dancers and musicians evoke the energy of a Harlem dance hall and an emotional connection to the music. DeCarava is known for his preference not to use the flash, relying on the natural light of the scene. As a result, his photographs are dark and velvety—often with much of the image obscured in the shadows—creating both ambiguity and an incredible depth of tone.

Dancer's Legs, cir. 1956 by Roy DeCarava / Gelatin silver print / DeCarava's celebrated series of images of dancers and musicians evoke the energy of a Harlem dance hall and an emotional connection to the music. DeCarava is known for his preference not to use the flash, relying on the natural light of the scene. As a result, his photographs are dark and velvety—often with much of the image obscured in the shadows—creating both ambiguity and an incredible depth of tone.

katstan: “ Man coming up Subway stairs, 1952 - Roy DeCarava ”

katstan: “ Man coming up Subway stairs, 1952 - Roy DeCarava ”

Roy DeCarava  Harlem14

Harlem – Roy DeCarava

Roy DeCarava Harlem14

Roy DeCarava From The Sound I Saw, Phaidon Press Inc., 2001

Black-And-White Black America

Roy DeCarava From The Sound I Saw, Phaidon Press Inc., 2001

Man in window, c. 1962 Roy de Carava

Man in window, c. 1962 Roy de Carava

Picture by the late Roy DeCarava. #blackhistorymonth

Picture by the late Roy DeCarava. #blackhistorymonth

By the time Decavara was painting his portraits of Harlem life in the 1950’s, long after the “Renissance” had receded into history, Harlem was a very different community. Description from commentariesonthetimes.wordpress.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

Harlem – Roy DeCarava

By the time Decavara was painting his portraits of Harlem life in the 1950’s, long after the “Renissance” had receded into history, Harlem was a very different community. Description from commentariesonthetimes.wordpress.com. I searched for this on bing.com/images

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