Did You Know...  The early U.S. Mint in Philadelphia had a Mascot which was a proud Bald Eagle, Named “Peter”  It is said that Peter was used as the model for the image of an eagle on the American eagle design, found on the reverse of the dollars issued from 1836 to 1839… and also used on the Flying Eagle cents from 1856 to 1858.  Today, some 180 year later, Peter the Mint Eagle’s stuffed body is on display in the lobby of the current Philadelphia mint in Philadelphia.

Did You Know... The early U.S. Mint in Philadelphia had a Mascot which was a proud Bald Eagle, Named “Peter” It is said that Peter was used as the model for the image of an eagle on the American eagle design, found on the reverse of the dollars issued from 1836 to 1839… and also used on the Flying Eagle cents from 1856 to 1858. Today, some 180 year later, Peter the Mint Eagle’s stuffed body is on display in the lobby of the current Philadelphia mint in Philadelphia.

Did You Know...   The bison on the 1913 Buffalo Nickel was modeled after a bison named Black Diamond, who lived in the New York Central Park Zoo.    In 1937 an Denver Mint employee improperly tried to clean the Buffalo Nickel die, and accidentally erased part of the front leg, resulting in a "Three Legged Buffalo Nickel."  Many of these error coins escaped into circulation before inspectors at the Denver Mint caught the error, making them valuable collectible coins today.

Did You Know... The bison on the 1913 Buffalo Nickel was modeled after a bison named Black Diamond, who lived in the New York Central Park Zoo. In 1937 an Denver Mint employee improperly tried to clean the Buffalo Nickel die, and accidentally erased part of the front leg, resulting in a "Three Legged Buffalo Nickel." Many of these error coins escaped into circulation before inspectors at the Denver Mint caught the error, making them valuable collectible coins today.

Did You Know... Continental Dollars are rich in American symbolism, using designs provided by Benjamin Franklin, and David Rittenhouse, who became the first Director of the U.S. Mint. The coin is filled with early American symbolism, with 13 interlocking rings, baring the names of the original colonies, with the words, “We Are One.”  The other side of the coin declares “Mind Your Business” under a  sundial, with the word “Fugio” above, which means, “I Fly,” symbolizing “Time Flies.”

Did You Know... Continental Dollars are rich in American symbolism, using designs provided by Benjamin Franklin, and David Rittenhouse, who became the first Director of the U.S. Mint. The coin is filled with early American symbolism, with 13 interlocking rings, baring the names of the original colonies, with the words, “We Are One.” The other side of the coin declares “Mind Your Business” under a sundial, with the word “Fugio” above, which means, “I Fly,” symbolizing “Time Flies.”

Did You Know...  America's oldest silver dollar is one the world's most expensive coin today, selling for a world Record price of $10,016,875 in January 2013.  It is said that our dollar sign comes from the reverse of the Spanish “Pillar Dollar, where the “Pillars of Hercules” are displayed wrapped with ribbons… and it’s the right-hand pillar and ribbon resembles our dollar sign today.

Did You Know... America's oldest silver dollar is one the world's most expensive coin today, selling for a world Record price of $10,016,875 in January 2013. It is said that our dollar sign comes from the reverse of the Spanish “Pillar Dollar, where the “Pillars of Hercules” are displayed wrapped with ribbons… and it’s the right-hand pillar and ribbon resembles our dollar sign today.

Did You Know... The five-cent coin is known as a nickel, but it wasn't always that way.  The first five-cent coin was called a "Half Disme" in 1792. The first Nickel coins weren't worth a Nickel!  They were actually pennies, the Flying Eagle Cent in 1856. It was made with Nickel alloy, and was called it a "Nickel." The Three Cent Nickel appeared in 1865.  Finally, the Five Cent Nickel debuted in 1866. Both five-cent coins, the Half-Dime and Nickel, circulated side-by-side until 1873.

Did You Know... The five-cent coin is known as a nickel, but it wasn't always that way. The first five-cent coin was called a "Half Disme" in 1792. The first Nickel coins weren't worth a Nickel! They were actually pennies, the Flying Eagle Cent in 1856. It was made with Nickel alloy, and was called it a "Nickel." The Three Cent Nickel appeared in 1865. Finally, the Five Cent Nickel debuted in 1866. Both five-cent coins, the Half-Dime and Nickel, circulated side-by-side until 1873.

Did You Know... High-end Rare Coins outperformed all Asset Classes including equities over the past 30+ years (from Penn State Rare Coin Study, Dr. Raymond Lombra, Dean of Economics).  Average Annual Appreciation 1979-2011. • Rare Coins (graded MS65) 12.6%. • Stock Market (NASDAQ & NYSE) 12.3%. • Rare Coins (graded MS 63-65) 10.7%. • Treasury Bonds 9.1%. • Gold Bullion 6.8%.

Did You Know... High-end Rare Coins outperformed all Asset Classes including equities over the past 30+ years (from Penn State Rare Coin Study, Dr. Raymond Lombra, Dean of Economics). Average Annual Appreciation 1979-2011. • Rare Coins (graded MS65) 12.6%. • Stock Market (NASDAQ & NYSE) 12.3%. • Rare Coins (graded MS 63-65) 10.7%. • Treasury Bonds 9.1%. • Gold Bullion 6.8%.

Did You Know... The most valuable U.S. Coin is virtually priceless, valued between $20 to $30 million. The 1849 Double Eagle is one of the most historic U.S. coins. The discovery of gold in California in 1848 provided the impetus for two new denominations, the Gold Dollar and Double Eagle. The new coin designs were made by the U.S. Mint Chief Engraver, James B. Longacre, one of the finest engravers.  Today this unique coin is in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian.

Did You Know... The most valuable U.S. Coin is virtually priceless, valued between $20 to $30 million. The 1849 Double Eagle is one of the most historic U.S. coins. The discovery of gold in California in 1848 provided the impetus for two new denominations, the Gold Dollar and Double Eagle. The new coin designs were made by the U.S. Mint Chief Engraver, James B. Longacre, one of the finest engravers. Today this unique coin is in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian.

Did you know...  That in 1879 and 1880, the United States minted two different versions of a $4 gold coin known as the "Stella". Only 425 example coins were minted, making the Stella one of the rarest and most valuable gold coins the U.S. has ever produced.  A few example coins were presented to members of Congress for their consideration - which were promptly spent in brothels. Many Stellas were mounted as jewelry and worn around the necks of madams.

Did you know... That in 1879 and 1880, the United States minted two different versions of a $4 gold coin known as the "Stella". Only 425 example coins were minted, making the Stella one of the rarest and most valuable gold coins the U.S. has ever produced. A few example coins were presented to members of Congress for their consideration - which were promptly spent in brothels. Many Stellas were mounted as jewelry and worn around the necks of madams.

Did You Know... Sam Brannan, was a young San Francisco merchant, skilled at the hype of supply and demand. He was around Sutter’s Mill, when he found out about the gold discovery. He took a sampling of gold dust in a small bottle, and promptly purchased every single pick axe, pan and shovel in the area. Brannan ran through the streets shouting about GOLD discovered, with proof in the  bottle. He then sold mining supplies he bought for 20 cents, for $15, making Brannan the richest man in…

Did You Know... Sam Brannan, was a young San Francisco merchant, skilled at the hype of supply and demand. He was around Sutter’s Mill, when he found out about the gold discovery. He took a sampling of gold dust in a small bottle, and promptly purchased every single pick axe, pan and shovel in the area. Brannan ran through the streets shouting about GOLD discovered, with proof in the bottle. He then sold mining supplies he bought for 20 cents, for $15, making Brannan the richest man in…

Did You Know... The Mysterious 1913 Liberty Head Nickel was produced in extremely limited quantities (only 5) without the authority of the U.S. Mint. Samuel Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, it's speculated he is responsible for striking the coins himself and then removing them from the Mint. He placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 offering to pay $500 for each coin as a cover. The Nickel was featured in a 1973 episode of Hawaii Five-O“ titled “The $100,000…

Did You Know... The Mysterious 1913 Liberty Head Nickel was produced in extremely limited quantities (only 5) without the authority of the U.S. Mint. Samuel Brown had been a Mint employee in 1913, it's speculated he is responsible for striking the coins himself and then removing them from the Mint. He placed an advertisement in The Numismatist in December 1919 offering to pay $500 for each coin as a cover. The Nickel was featured in a 1973 episode of Hawaii Five-O“ titled “The $100,000…

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