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'A GLOSSARY OF CELTIC WORDS IN CORNISH DIALECT' by Robert Morton Nance. Note - the link connects to a digitised version of all 450 words in the Glossary. ✫ღ⊰n

'A GLOSSARY OF CELTIC WORDS IN CORNISH DIALECT' by Robert Morton Nance. Note - the link connects to a digitised version of all 450 words in the Glossary. ✫ღ⊰n

'CELTIC WORDS IN CORNISH DIALECT - Glossary of Celtic Words in Cornish Dialect' by Robert Morton Nance: the last page of the Glossary.     ✫ღ⊰n

'CELTIC WORDS IN CORNISH DIALECT - Glossary of Celtic Words in Cornish Dialect' by Robert Morton Nance: the last page of the Glossary. ✫ღ⊰n

Cornish (Kernowek or Kernewek) is a Brythonic Celtic language and a recognised minority language of the United Kingdom. Along with Welsh and Breton, it is directly descended from the ancient British language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language came to dominate. The language continued to function as a common community language in parts of Cornwall until the late 18th century.

Cornish (Kernowek or Kernewek) is a Brythonic Celtic language and a recognised minority language of the United Kingdom. Along with Welsh and Breton, it is directly descended from the ancient British language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language came to dominate. The language continued to function as a common community language in parts of Cornwall until the late 18th century.

MODERN CORNISH DIALECT | 'Understanding Proper Spoken Cornish' - some colloquial language pointers     ✫ღ⊰n

MODERN CORNISH DIALECT | 'Understanding Proper Spoken Cornish' - some colloquial language pointers ✫ღ⊰n

HUNDREDS OF CORNWALL | 'From Anglo-Saxon times until the 19th century, Cornwall was divided into hundreds (some with the suffix "-shire", as in Pydarshire, East and West Wivelshire and Powdershire which were first recorded as names between 1184-1187). In Cornish, the word for "hundred" is "keverang" (pl. "keverangow"), the equivalent of the Welsh "cantref".'     ✫ღ⊰n

HUNDREDS OF CORNWALL | 'From Anglo-Saxon times until the 19th century, Cornwall was divided into hundreds (some with the suffix "-shire", as in Pydarshire, East and West Wivelshire and Powdershire which were first recorded as names between 1184-1187). In Cornish, the word for "hundred" is "keverang" (pl. "keverangow"), the equivalent of the Welsh "cantref".' ✫ღ⊰n

'A CONCISE DICTIONARY OF CORNISH PLACE-NAMES' | Craig Weatherhill     ✫ღ⊰n

'A CONCISE DICTIONARY OF CORNISH PLACE-NAMES' | Craig Weatherhill ✫ღ⊰n

Written in 1947 by Mabel Beatrice Retallick.

Written in 1947 by Mabel Beatrice Retallick.

'MEMORANDUMS OF THE CORNISH TONGUE' | Compiled by William Borlase between 1748 to 1753: 'This manuscript can be described as an eighteenth century study of Cornish grammar and vocabulary and is about as close as you can get to a Cornish/English dictionary although only a number of words are translated.' The manuscript was never published but has now been digitised.     ✫ღ⊰n

'MEMORANDUMS OF THE CORNISH TONGUE' | Compiled by William Borlase between 1748 to 1753: 'This manuscript can be described as an eighteenth century study of Cornish grammar and vocabulary and is about as close as you can get to a Cornish/English dictionary although only a number of words are translated.' The manuscript was never published but has now been digitised. ✫ღ⊰n

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