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Three generations stand outside their stone cottage in Galway Ireland 1927 An early autochrome by Clifton R. Adams for National Geographic

Three generations stand outside their stone cottage in Galway Ireland 1927 An early autochrome by Clifton R. Adams for National Geographic

Scotch-Irish Immigrant -- I wonder how many people realize that the Scotch-Irish were *Scottish*, and not Irish....They were Scots that moved to Ireland {who then later moved to America}. *shakes head*

Scotch-Irish Immigrant -- I wonder how many people realize that the Scotch-Irish were *Scottish*, and not Irish....They were Scots that moved to Ireland {who then later moved to America}. *shakes head*

Abandoned Cottage on the Famine Relief Road in Killary Harbour, Connemara, Connaught, Ireland Photographic Print by Gareth McCormack at Art.com

Abandoned Cottage on the Famine Relief Road in Killary Harbour, Connemara, Connaught, Ireland

Abandoned Cottage on the Famine Relief Road in Killary Harbour, Connemara, Connaught, Ireland Photographic Print by Gareth McCormack at Art.com

Family outside cottage, somewhere in Ireland. Reminds me of a picture of great-great grandparents.

Family outside cottage, somewhere in Ireland. Reminds me of a picture of great-great grandparents.

Ever wanted to know how Irish people wrote before they adopted the Roman Alphabet? This is the 'Ogham Alphabet' and its how the pre-Irish used to write. This book, the "Book of Ballymote", dates to at least 1st Century BC.

Ever wanted to know how Irish people wrote before they adopted the Roman Alphabet? This is the 'Ogham Alphabet' and its how the pre-Irish used to write. This book, the "Book of Ballymote", dates to at least 1st Century BC.

An Spidéal, Galway, Ireland, 31 May 1913, woman in front of cottage with spinning wheel.

An Spidéal, Galway, Ireland, 31 May 1913, woman in front of cottage with spinning wheel.

The monastic settlement at Glendalough, dates from the 6th century. The ancient ruins and graveyard are nestled in a scenic valley, creating a mystical setting and the perfect sight for superstitious visitors. This is a great stop for visitors traveling from Dublin

The monastic settlement at Glendalough, dates from the 6th century. The ancient ruins and graveyard are nestled in a scenic valley, creating a mystical setting and the perfect sight for superstitious visitors. This is a great stop for visitors traveling from Dublin

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