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Antoine Barada  1/2 Omaha Indian and 1/2 French  My great great great (3greats) Grandfather

Antoine Barada 1/2 Omaha Indian and 1/2 French My great great great (3greats) Grandfather

Dust storm during the Dust Bowl of 1930s. THIS is the moment I will say, "no, you Don't have to clean your room today."

Dust storm during the Dust Bowl of 1930s. THIS is the moment I will say, "no, you Don't have to clean your room today."

Standing Hawk, Little Chief, Rattling Thunder - Omaha - 1866    Mo-Ha-Nuzhe (Standing Bent) - Omaha - 1868   Gahhi’Ge (The Chief) - Omaha - 1869    Omaha men - 1875   Op-Po-Hom-Mon-Ne (Buck Elk

Standing Hawk, Little Chief, Rattling Thunder - Omaha - 1866 Mo-Ha-Nuzhe (Standing Bent) - Omaha - 1868 Gahhi’Ge (The Chief) - Omaha - 1869 Omaha men - 1875 Op-Po-Hom-Mon-Ne (Buck Elk

1939 - Child of white migrant adding water to boiling beans on stove which was set up immediately after reaching camping grounds near Harlingen, Texas

1939 - Child of white migrant adding water to boiling beans on stove which was set up immediately after reaching camping grounds near Harlingen, Texas

"A giant sequoia log, Sequoia National Park, California, undated, c1910." (via Historic American Engineering Record)

"A giant sequoia log, Sequoia National Park, California, undated, c1910." (via Historic American Engineering Record)

Mart Payne, 5 years old, picks from 10 to 20 pounds a day. His mother said "Mart, he haint old nuff to go to school much, but he kin pick his 20 pounds a day. Mostly 10 to 15 pounds." - In the rural south it was not uncommon on the small farms for the family members to all go to the fields and pick cotton-white or black, you picked. In the 1950s the going rate for a hundred pounds of cotton was fifty cents - the more you picked, the more you made.

Mart Payne, 5 years old, picks from 10 to 20 pounds a day. His mother said "Mart, he haint old nuff to go to school much, but he kin pick his 20 pounds a day. Mostly 10 to 15 pounds." - In the rural south it was not uncommon on the small farms for the family members to all go to the fields and pick cotton-white or black, you picked. In the 1950s the going rate for a hundred pounds of cotton was fifty cents - the more you picked, the more you made.

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