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​Without Dark Matter, There Would Be No Life

​Without Dark Matter, There Would Be No Life

Dark Matter Filaments Credit: NASA/UNC  The supposed distribution of dark matter throughout the universe is represented in this computer model.

Dark Matter Filaments Credit: NASA/UNC The supposed distribution of dark matter throughout the universe is represented in this computer model.

THE UNIVERSE CONSISTS OF  5 %VISIBLE MATTER  25% DARK MATTER  70% DARK ENERGY

THE UNIVERSE CONSISTS OF 5 %VISIBLE MATTER 25% DARK MATTER 70% DARK ENERGY

The mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the matter in the universe may behave more like wavy fluids than solid particles, helping to explain the shapes of galaxies, a new study suggests. Broadhurst and his colleagues have for the first time simulated what galaxies might look like if dark matter was made of light bosons. They said their models more accurately reflect what galaxies actually look like than more conventional models where dark matter is made of fermions.

The mysterious dark matter that makes up most of the matter in the universe may behave more like wavy fluids than solid particles, helping to explain the shapes of galaxies, a new study suggests. Broadhurst and his colleagues have for the first time simulated what galaxies might look like if dark matter was made of light bosons. They said their models more accurately reflect what galaxies actually look like than more conventional models where dark matter is made of fermions.

Dark matter is an invisible material that emits or absorbs no light but betrays its presence by interacting gravitationally with visible matter. This image from Dark Universe shows the distribution of dark matter in the universe, as simulated with a novel, high-resolution algorithm at the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Dark matter is an invisible material that emits or absorbs no light but betrays its presence by interacting gravitationally with visible matter. This image from Dark Universe shows the distribution of dark matter in the universe, as simulated with a novel, high-resolution algorithm at the Kavli Institute of Particle Astrophysics & Cosmology at Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

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