Saying her art practice is about ‘mistranslating the history of ancient objects,’ Brooklyn-based sculptor Sarah Peters ‘misinterprets’ Akkadian rulers, Greek busts and more with stunning results in several bronze heads at LES gallery Eleven Rivington. (Through May 17th).Sarah Peters, Portrait of a Bearded Man with Triangular Base, bronze, 17.5 x 7 x 13 inches, 2015.

Saying her art practice is about ‘mistranslating the history of ancient objects,’ Brooklyn-based sculptor Sarah Peters ‘misinterprets’ Akkadian rulers, Greek busts and more with stunning results in several bronze heads at LES gallery Eleven Rivington. (Through May 17th).Sarah Peters, Portrait of a Bearded Man with Triangular Base, bronze, 17.5 x 7 x 13 inches, 2015.

New York artist Kehinde Wiley turns the tables on canonical western art history in paintings which substitute contemporary characters of African descent for European figures. Here, in a centerpiece of Wiley’s current Brooklyn Museum exhibition, a young man plays the role of odalisque. (Through May 24th).Kehinde Wiley, installation view of ‘Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic,” Brooklyn Museum, February, 2015.

New York artist Kehinde Wiley turns the tables on canonical western art history in paintings which substitute contemporary characters of African descent for European figures. Here, in a centerpiece of Wiley’s current Brooklyn Museum exhibition, a young man plays the role of odalisque. (Through May 24th).Kehinde Wiley, installation view of ‘Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic,” Brooklyn Museum, February, 2015.

Working from hundreds of photos he shot at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, LA artist Ry Rocklen created sculptures that hint at the hidden sides of history in his latest show at Mesler/Feuer. (On the Lower East Side through Feb 14th). Ry Rocklen, Blue Eyed Worshipper, Southern Mesopotamia, 2600-2500 B.C., ceramic vessels, mirror-mounted panel, brass, and glass, 52 ½ x 32 ¾ x 9 ½ inches, 2015.

Working from hundreds of photos he shot at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, LA artist Ry Rocklen created sculptures that hint at the hidden sides of history in his latest show at Mesler/Feuer. (On the Lower East Side through Feb 14th). Ry Rocklen, Blue Eyed Worshipper, Southern Mesopotamia, 2600-2500 B.C., ceramic vessels, mirror-mounted panel, brass, and glass, 52 ½ x 32 ¾ x 9 ½ inches, 2015.

Brooklyn art duo FAILE and artist friend BAST put a new spin on the old question, ‘what is art?’ by teaming up at the Brooklyn Museum to present a free arcade decorated in their signature posters. According to the museum text, they aim to relieve ‘the pressure of a traditional gallery environment,’ which they do in spades – it’s hard to remember you’re in a museum. (Through Oct 4th).Installation view of the FAILE and BAST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade, Brooklyn Museum, September, 2015.

Brooklyn art duo FAILE and artist friend BAST put a new spin on the old question, ‘what is art?’ by teaming up at the Brooklyn Museum to present a free arcade decorated in their signature posters. According to the museum text, they aim to relieve ‘the pressure of a traditional gallery environment,’ which they do in spades – it’s hard to remember you’re in a museum. (Through Oct 4th).Installation view of the FAILE and BAST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade, Brooklyn Museum, September, 2015.

British artist Jonathan Baldock’s soft sculptures channel both Louise Bourgeois’ use of soft fabric to create unnerving characters and Barbara Hepworth’s rounded, organic sculptural forms to create cheery yet creepy totemic forms. (At Nicelle Beauchene Gallery through Feb 7th). Mutter, steel, hessian, felt, thread, polystyrene, dolls eyes, brass, 65 ½ x 15 ¾ x 11 ½ inches, 2015.

British artist Jonathan Baldock’s soft sculptures channel both Louise Bourgeois’ use of soft fabric to create unnerving characters and Barbara Hepworth’s rounded, organic sculptural forms to create cheery yet creepy totemic forms. (At Nicelle Beauchene Gallery through Feb 7th). Mutter, steel, hessian, felt, thread, polystyrene, dolls eyes, brass, 65 ½ x 15 ¾ x 11 ½ inches, 2015.

It’s not unusual to see second hand clothing as an art material in New York galleries, but no one quite turns it into the unique sculptural and painting surface that LA-based Japanese artist Aiko Hachisuka does. Here, in her installation on the Lower East Side at Eleven Rivington, columns covered in printed fabrics make dramatics statements from close and far. (Through May 17th).Aiko Hachisuka, installation view at Eleven Rivington, April 2015.

It’s not unusual to see second hand clothing as an art material in New York galleries, but no one quite turns it into the unique sculptural and painting surface that LA-based Japanese artist Aiko Hachisuka does. Here, in her installation on the Lower East Side at Eleven Rivington, columns covered in printed fabrics make dramatics statements from close and far. (Through May 17th).Aiko Hachisuka, installation view at Eleven Rivington, April 2015.

Displayed under glass and supported by carefully crafted supports, Alan Wiener’s two bricks and a stone are everyday objects given the royal treatment but the mini-pedestals actually steal the show. Created from aquaresin in controlled pours, their shapes suggest candy, bones and ancient architectural embellishments. (At 11R through July 29th). Installation view of Alan Wiener’s Untitled (8), Untitled (6) and Untitled (5) from 2014 and 2015 in aquaresin, brick and stone at 11R, June, 2016.

Displayed under glass and supported by carefully crafted supports, Alan Wiener’s two bricks and a stone are everyday objects given the royal treatment but the mini-pedestals actually steal the show. Created from aquaresin in controlled pours, their shapes suggest candy, bones and ancient architectural embellishments. (At 11R through July 29th). Installation view of Alan Wiener’s Untitled (8), Untitled (6) and Untitled (5) from 2014 and 2015 in aquaresin, brick and stone at 11R, June, 2016.

Titled ‘Trips I’ve Never Been On,’ Shara Hughes’ solo show at Marlborough Gallery includes slightly surreal scenarios like this one, a juxtaposition of landscapes that seems both dream-like and real. (In Chelsea through March 12th). Mushroom Hunt, oil, acrylic, flashe, caulk, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 64 x 54 inches, 2015.

Titled ‘Trips I’ve Never Been On,’ Shara Hughes’ solo show at Marlborough Gallery includes slightly surreal scenarios like this one, a juxtaposition of landscapes that seems both dream-like and real. (In Chelsea through March 12th). Mushroom Hunt, oil, acrylic, flashe, caulk, spray paint and enamel on canvas, 64 x 54 inches, 2015.

Paintings of jungles, tropical fruit, and monkeys and sculptures of snakes and strange flora make ‘Tiger, Tiger’ at Salon94 Bowery one of the lushest shows open in New York this summer. Yutaka Sone’s folk-art inflected rattan and steel palm in the foreground sets the laid-back tone. (On the Lower East Side through August 21st).Installation view of Tiger, Tiger at Salon94 Bowery, July 2015. (foreground: Yutaka Sone, Tropical Composition/Traveler’s Palm #1, rattan and steel, 143 x 165 x 24…

Paintings of jungles, tropical fruit, and monkeys and sculptures of snakes and strange flora make ‘Tiger, Tiger’ at Salon94 Bowery one of the lushest shows open in New York this summer. Yutaka Sone’s folk-art inflected rattan and steel palm in the foreground sets the laid-back tone. (On the Lower East Side through August 21st).Installation view of Tiger, Tiger at Salon94 Bowery, July 2015. (foreground: Yutaka Sone, Tropical Composition/Traveler’s Palm #1, rattan and steel, 143 x 165 x 24…

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