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30 Black Female Leaders You Should Know About

Shirley Chisholm was the first black woman to be elected to Congress, winning in New York in 1968 and retiring from office in 1983. She campaigned for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972, but is best known for her work on several Congressional committees throughout her career. A feisty politician, Chisholm has also been recognized in popular culture and in the political and academic worlds for her symbolic importance and career achievements

"I want history to remember me not just as the first black woman to be elected to Congress, not as the first black woman to have made a bid for the presidency of the United States, but as a black woman who lived in the 20th century and dared to be herself." Shirley Chisholm 1968

Women in the War Industry Amanda Smith, an African-American woman employed in the Long Beach Plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company. Between 1940 and 1944, approximately one million civilian African Americans entered the labor force; 600,000 of them were female. The proportion of black women in industrial occupations almost tripled during the war, rising from 6.5 to 18 percent. Los Angeles-area aircraft plants were among the first to offer them employment. This woman worked at the Long…

Jamaica’s Alia Atkinson makes history to become first black woman to win world swimming title

THE FIRST BLACK WOMAN LAWYER IN AMERICA: Charlotte Ray Became First Black Female Lawyer 140 Years Ago. She achieved her historic feat in 1872, becoming just the third woman ever admitted to practice law in the country at the time. Ray was also the first woman admitted to practice law in the nation’s capital and the first woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.

"The Haymakers". July 22, 1910. African American women. At that time, middle-class Black women who were supported by their husbands and did not have to work were generally very socially and politically active, whether fighting for Blacks' civil rights or organizing to keep the Black community together.