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"Terrible" Lobster -- This blind lobster, discovered in 2008 during a Census of Marine Life expedition, was given the scientific name Dinochelus ausubeli, which  is derived from the Greek dinos, meaning terrible and fearful; chela, meaning claw; and ausubeli, in honor of Jesse Ausubel, a co-founder of  the Census of Marine Life.    The lobster likely uses its exaggerated claw, or cheliped, to defend against other crustaceans.

"Terrible" Lobster -- This blind lobster, discovered in 2008 during a Census of Marine Life expedition, was given the scientific name Dinochelus ausubeli, which is derived from the Greek dinos, meaning terrible and fearful; chela, meaning claw; and ausubeli, in honor of Jesse Ausubel, a co-founder of the Census of Marine Life. The lobster likely uses its exaggerated claw, or cheliped, to defend against other crustaceans.

Photographed off Australia's Lizard Island by a Census of Marine Life expedition, the two blue trees are actually a single worm's "crowns"—each spiral is a series of tentacles used in breathing and in passive feeding on tiny, floating foodstuffs.

Photographed off Australia's Lizard Island by a Census of Marine Life expedition, the two blue trees are actually a single worm's "crowns"—each spiral is a series of tentacles used in breathing and in passive feeding on tiny, floating foodstuffs.

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