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Tsunamis Where they occur: Most common around the Pacific Rim Max size: Largest ever recorded was 524m (1,720ft) high Max speed: 800kmph (500mph) Casualties: The current death rate for the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami disaster is 200,000

#Floods ... Rivers and lakes overflow and, as the ground becomes saturated, water builds up on the surface. Coastal areas hit by hurricanes, or tsunamis, can suffer flooding from the sea.

#Sandstorms Sandstorms and dust storms occur most commonly in hotter places which experience drought, where there is a permanent high pressure and clear skies that yield little or no rain. High winds pick up loose sand and dust and move it a high speeds across the ground, altering the landscape and severely reducing visibility.

#Drought The basic cause of drought is an insufficient amount of rainfall over a prolonged period of time. Lack of rain can be caused by global patterns of air circulation or through man-made intervention. Dams and irrigation systems can disturb the natural flow of rivers and lakes which means insufficient water vapour rises into the air to form rain clouds. Other factors that contribute to drought are high temperatures, low humidity and high winds. It occurs all over the world...

The basic cause of #drought is an insufficient amount of rainfall over a prolonged period of time. Lack of rain can be caused by global patterns of air circulation or through man-made intervention. Dams and irrigation systems can disturb the natural flow of rivers and lakes which means insufficient water vapour rises into the air to form rain clouds. Other factors that contribute to drought are high temperatures, low humidity and high winds.

#Lightning The Empire State Building was hit 15 times in 15 minutes during one storm. US Park Ranger, Roy C Sullivan, holds the record for being struck by lightning – he was hit seven times between 1942 and 1977.

#Volcanoes...When rock from the mantle melts, it becomes magma, moving to the surface through the Earth’s outer crust and releasing pent-up gases. When the pressure is too much, volcanoes erupt. Pressure builds up if the supply of magma to the volcano from the Earth's mantle is high. Alternatively, pressure can increase within the magma chamber inside the volcano. This is because as the magma in the chamber starts to cool, it releases gases which expand, thereby increasing the pressure.

#Icebergs... are spectacular floating masses of frozen freshwater. They are most common during the spring and summer months, as rising temperatures cause enormous lumps of ice to break away from glaciers and polar ice sheets and float out into the ocean a process known as ‘calving’.

#Tornadoes... There is simply no natural phenomenon more terrifying than a tornado. Twisters, as they’ve become known, appear almost without warning. They can occur any time during the year, providing the conditions are right. In order for a vortex – a spiralling funnel of wind – to be classified as a tornado, it must be in contact with both the ground below and the storm cloud above.