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Variegated Meadowsweet (filipendula ulmaria variegata): This perennial grows best in full to part sun with regular soil moisture.  It gets to be 3-4 feet tall and produces showy plumes of white flowers.  This is a very nice plant.  It doesn't like to dry out.

Variegated Meadowsweet (filipendula ulmaria variegata): This perennial grows best in full to part sun with regular soil moisture. It gets to be 3-4 feet tall and produces showy plumes of white flowers. This is a very nice plant. It doesn't like to dry out.

Yellowtop (packera glabella): This appears to be a yellowtop, also called butterweed, a wildflower that is common if not always popular across the South. It pops up everywhere, so if you do not want more, clip its flowers before the reseed.

Yellowtop (packera glabella): This appears to be a yellowtop, also called butterweed, a wildflower that is common if not always popular across the South. It pops up everywhere, so if you do not want more, clip its flowers before the reseed.

Yellow Woodsorrel (oxalis stricta): This plant appears to be woodsorrel with clover-like foliage and yellow or pink flowers with five petals. Spreads by seed and many consider it a weed. Also called sourgrass and the flowers close up at night and open in the daytime.

Yellow Woodsorrel (oxalis stricta): This plant appears to be woodsorrel with clover-like foliage and yellow or pink flowers with five petals. Spreads by seed and many consider it a weed. Also called sourgrass and the flowers close up at night and open in the daytime.

Poison Ivy (toxicodendron radicans): This is poison ivy. If you are allergic, try to have someone else remove it for you. From the picture it seems to be vining and you will want to make sure you get it all up and place in a garbage bag. It can be a vine or shrub form. Keep an eye on the area because it may have rooted and will be sending up more shoots.

Poison Ivy (toxicodendron radicans): This is poison ivy. If you are allergic, try to have someone else remove it for you. From the picture it seems to be vining and you will want to make sure you get it all up and place in a garbage bag. It can be a vine or shrub form. Keep an eye on the area because it may have rooted and will be sending up more shoots.

Poison Oak (toxicodendron diversilobum): Vine or shrub. Follow the adage, "Leaves of three, let them be." Poison ivy is more common in states east of the Rocky Mountains, while poison oak has the same role west of the Rockies (and especially in the Willamette Valley). Here's some control info: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7431.html  YES, you guess it.

Poison Oak (toxicodendron diversilobum): Vine or shrub. Follow the adage, "Leaves of three, let them be." Poison ivy is more common in states east of the Rocky Mountains, while poison oak has the same role west of the Rockies (and especially in the Willamette Valley). Here's some control info: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7431.html YES, you guess it.

Calla Lily (zantedeschia aethiopica): This moisture-loving, South African perennial produces large, beautiful white flowers in spring. It grows to about 3 ft. high and does well in full sun or part shade with regular water.

Calla Lily (zantedeschia aethiopica): This moisture-loving, South African perennial produces large, beautiful white flowers in spring. It grows to about 3 ft. high and does well in full sun or part shade with regular water.

Fleabane (erigeron species): This appears to be one of the fleabanes, native wildflowers in the Sunflower family. Some are weeds, others are garden perennials. In the end,  if you can contain it to an area, leave it, but if you can't, pull it up. If you do leave it, you'll have a natural bee plant when not a lot of others are in bloom and if you remember to mow it once after it flowers so it can't set seed, you should be all right.

Fleabane (erigeron species): This appears to be one of the fleabanes, native wildflowers in the Sunflower family. Some are weeds, others are garden perennials. In the end, if you can contain it to an area, leave it, but if you can't, pull it up. If you do leave it, you'll have a natural bee plant when not a lot of others are in bloom and if you remember to mow it once after it flowers so it can't set seed, you should be all right.

Mugwort Sagebrush Wormwood (artemisia species): This is mugwort. ~300 species of Sunflower Family annuals, perennials and shrubs native to open places mostly in the Northern hemisphere. Flower heads tiny and not daisy like.

Mugwort Sagebrush Wormwood (artemisia species): This is mugwort. ~300 species of Sunflower Family annuals, perennials and shrubs native to open places mostly in the Northern hemisphere. Flower heads tiny and not daisy like.

Oyster Plant (tradescantia spathacea variegata): Oyster plant is a short-stemmed, tender foliage plant that makes attractive, small, dense, spreading clumps . It forms a solid groundcover of upright leaves. The six- to eight-inch-long, sword-shaped leaves are green above and purplish below. The unusual flowers, borne down among the leaves, appear as clusters of tiny white flowers nestled within two boat-shaped, purplish bracts.  Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11 where it is noted for its ease…

Oyster Plant (tradescantia spathacea variegata): Oyster plant is a short-stemmed, tender foliage plant that makes attractive, small, dense, spreading clumps . It forms a solid groundcover of upright leaves. The six- to eight-inch-long, sword-shaped leaves are green above and purplish below. The unusual flowers, borne down among the leaves, appear as clusters of tiny white flowers nestled within two boat-shaped, purplish bracts. Winter hardy to USDA Zones 9-11 where it is noted for its ease…

Garlic Mustard (alliaria petiolata): This appears to be garlic mustard, a biennial weed.  It can be highly invasive and in addition to crowding out other plants, its roots emit a chemical that prevents other plants from growing nearby. To confirm this i.d., crush the leaves, which should smell like garlic. The thin white taproot should smell like horseradish.  If the leaves don't have garlic mustard's telltale scent, let us know and we'll research it further.

Garlic Mustard (alliaria petiolata): This appears to be garlic mustard, a biennial weed. It can be highly invasive and in addition to crowding out other plants, its roots emit a chemical that prevents other plants from growing nearby. To confirm this i.d., crush the leaves, which should smell like garlic. The thin white taproot should smell like horseradish. If the leaves don't have garlic mustard's telltale scent, let us know and we'll research it further.

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