Eclipse of Venus  NASA’s Picture of the Day on Aug.20, 2013.   Usually it is the Earth’s Moon that eclipses the Sun. Last June, most unusually, the planet Venus took a turn. Pictured above during the occultation, the Sun was imaged in three colors of ultraviolet light by the Earth-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, with the dark region toward the right corresponding to a coronal hole. The next Venusian solar eclipse will occur in 2117.

Eclipse of Venus NASA’s Picture of the Day on Aug.20, 2013. Usually it is the Earth’s Moon that eclipses the Sun. Last June, most unusually, the planet Venus took a turn. Pictured above during the occultation, the Sun was imaged in three colors of ultraviolet light by the Earth-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, with the dark region toward the right corresponding to a coronal hole. The next Venusian solar eclipse will occur in 2117.

Venus is one unique planet when it comes to rotational motion. It takes Venus 243 Earth days to completely rotate on its axis, but just 225 days to orbit the sun. Venus also is one of two planets that rotates in reverse, a phenomenon called retrograde motion, which according to most theories is due to an ancient planetary collision.

Venus is one unique planet when it comes to rotational motion. It takes Venus 243 Earth days to completely rotate on its axis, but just 225 days to orbit the sun. Venus also is one of two planets that rotates in reverse, a phenomenon called retrograde motion, which according to most theories is due to an ancient planetary collision.

SDO Collects Its 100 Millionth Image | by NASA Goddard Photo and Video. An instrument on our Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured its 100 millionth image of the sun. The instrument is the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, or AIA, which uses four telescopes working parallel to gather eight images of the sun – cycling through 10 different wavelengths -- every 12 seconds. This is a processed image of SDO multiwavelength blend from Jan. 19, 2015, the date of the spacecraft's 100th millionth…

SDO Collects Its 100 Millionth Image | by NASA Goddard Photo and Video. An instrument on our Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured its 100 millionth image of the sun. The instrument is the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, or AIA, which uses four telescopes working parallel to gather eight images of the sun – cycling through 10 different wavelengths -- every 12 seconds. This is a processed image of SDO multiwavelength blend from Jan. 19, 2015, the date of the spacecraft's 100th millionth…

On August 31, 2012 the Sun threw a major tantrum. It started with a vast arc of material towering over its surface, a stream of plasma flowing between two sunspots. Sometimes these collapse back down to the Sun’s surface, but this one exploded, blasting hundreds of millions of tons of material out into space.    SDO captured this ridiculously awesome picture of the arc just before it erupted!

On August 31, 2012 the Sun threw a major tantrum. It started with a vast arc of material towering over its surface, a stream of plasma flowing between two sunspots. Sometimes these collapse back down to the Sun’s surface, but this one exploded, blasting hundreds of millions of tons of material out into space. SDO captured this ridiculously awesome picture of the arc just before it erupted!

Blue Sun ~~ Captured in extreme ultraviolet light, the sun is pictured in a shade of azure blue. #sun #ultraviolet_light #blue #space

Blue Sun ~~ Captured in extreme ultraviolet light, the sun is pictured in a shade of azure blue. #sun #ultraviolet_light #blue #space

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