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“Each year, thousands of people are trafficked within and across our borders to serve as sex slaves or un-free labor in U.S. homes, fields and factories. Many enter via our southern border with Mexico, after having been trafficked within or across Mexico from other parts of the Americas and beyond…enslaved migrant laborers are often seen simply as undocumented workers who are in the country illegally, while sex trafficking victims are merely prostitutes plying an illegal trade.

'Four-year-old Mary shucks two pots of oysters a day at Dunbar. She also tends the baby when she's not working! The boss said that next year Mary will work steady as the rest of them. The mother is the fastest shucker in the place. Earns 1.50 a day. Works part of the time with her sick baby in her arms. Father works on the dock. Location: Dunbar, Louisiana. 1911.'

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn.

Michael Shermer on

Noone who sees the photo soon forgets it: A small boy, about 3 years old, dressed in a child-sized Ku Klux Klan robe and pointed hat, reaches out to touch his reflection in a riot shield as the African-American trooper holding the shield looks down at him. It was a fleeting moment away from the main action during a Barrow County Ku Klux Klan group’s rally on Sept. 5, 1992, in downtown Gainesville, and just before the little boy’s mother pulled him away. (Photo: Todd Robertson)

J. Marion Sims is called “the Father of Gynecology” due to his experiments on enslaved women in Alabama who were often submitted as guinea pigs by their plantation owners who could not use them for sexual pleasure.

This ofrenda was constructed in remembrance of women killed along the Texas/Mexico border. I believe there is one sugar skull for every women who has been found dead. The symbolism is strong, powerful and controversial. Each skull has the name of one woman killed in the Juarez, Mexico area. Unfortunately little has been done to stop the carnage. The installation was presented at Dia de los Muertos in 2006 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque.