Explore Furniture And Upholstery and more!

Explore related topics

A Fine Queen Anne Mahogany Corner Chair, Massachusetts, Circa 1770, the horseshoe-form back with molded crest above a pair of pierced splats and ring-turned uprights, the drop-in seat within a plain apron and supported on a cabriole frontal leg, three turned tapering legs ending in pad feet at the rear, all joined by a block-and ring-turned X-form stretcher; retains an old mellow color, height 32 in., width 26.3 in., depth 26.5 in.

A Fine Queen Anne Mahogany Corner Chair, Massachusetts, Circa 1770, the horseshoe-form back with molded crest above a pair of pierced splats and ring-turned uprights, the drop-in seat within a plain apron and supported on a cabriole frontal leg, three turned tapering legs ending in pad feet at the rear, all joined by a block-and ring-turned X-form stretcher; retains an old mellow color, height 32 in., width 26.3 in., depth 26.5 in.

A mid 18th Century mahogany corner armchair with horseshoe patterned back and twin solid shaped splats, the drop in seat upholstered in tapestry

A mid 18th Century mahogany corner armchair with horseshoe patterned back and twin solid shaped splats, the drop in seat upholstered in tapestry

QUEEN ANNE COMPASS SEAT CORNER CHAIR - Boston, Massachusetts, Circa 1750.  Primary Wood:  Walnut, Secondary Woods:  Pine, Maple Seat Frame.  Height:  31 1/2 inches, Width:  28 3/4 inches, Depth:  27 1/2 inches.  Reference: For a similar chair also from Boston see Broke Jobe & Myrna Kaye's, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era, pages 360-361, figure 100. Photograph © Bruce M. White

QUEEN ANNE COMPASS SEAT CORNER CHAIR - Boston, Massachusetts, Circa 1750. Primary Wood: Walnut, Secondary Woods: Pine, Maple Seat Frame. Height: 31 1/2 inches, Width: 28 3/4 inches, Depth: 27 1/2 inches. Reference: For a similar chair also from Boston see Broke Jobe & Myrna Kaye's, New England Furniture: The Colonial Era, pages 360-361, figure 100. Photograph © Bruce M. White

DIY Embroidery Kits and Patterns Without the Kitsch

DIY Embroidery Kits and Patterns Without the Kitsch

The original English orange marmalade was invented in 1797 by Janet Keiller who ran a small shop, specialising in sweet products and preserves, with her son James – together they opened a factory and production of the famous Dundee Marmalade began!

The original English orange marmalade was invented in 1797 by Janet Keiller who ran a small shop, specialising in sweet products and preserves, with her son James – together they opened a factory and production of the famous Dundee Marmalade began!

Pinterest
Search