A lock of hair from the head of Napoleon Bonaparte, the lock in a figure of eight is set amongst gold and silver formal foliage, at the centre an 'N' beneath glass, it is framed in a brooch with a line of pearls and black enamel, the back is engraved "Napoleon Bonaparte lock of his hair, given to Mrs Riley, Major Poppleton 27 July 1821". Captain William Thomas Poppleton of the 53rd Regiment acted as the Emperor's orderly, they were almost in daily contact.

A lock of hair from the head of Napoleon Bonaparte, the lock in a figure of eight is set amongst gold and silver formal foliage, at the centre an 'N' beneath glass, it is framed in a brooch with a line of pearls and black enamel, the back is engraved "Napoleon Bonaparte lock of his hair, given to Mrs Riley, Major Poppleton 27 July 1821". Captain William Thomas Poppleton of the 53rd Regiment acted as the Emperor's orderly, they were almost in daily contact.

The ring, hallmarked London 1822, one year after the Emperor’s death, is inscribed with the words: “This lock of hair of Napoleon Buonaparte was presented to John Soane Esquire by Miss Elizabeth Balcombe.” It also includes the words “Prier Pour Moi” (pray for me).

The ring, hallmarked London 1822, one year after the Emperor’s death, is inscribed with the words: “This lock of hair of Napoleon Buonaparte was presented to John Soane Esquire by Miss Elizabeth Balcombe.” It also includes the words “Prier Pour Moi” (pray for me).

This Day in History: Apr 10, 1834: A torture chamber is uncovered by arson

This Day in History: Apr 10, 1834: A torture chamber is uncovered by arson

Apollo, silver denarius  Obverse: laureate head of Apollo wearing hair in knot with two locks on his neck; small lyre behind. Reverse: frontal image of Diana Lucifera standing facing right, holding lighted long torch in each hand, with bow and quiver on her shoulder; inscription on left: M . F; on right: P. CLODIVS. 42 BCE. Syd. 1117.   Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo.

Apollo, silver denarius Obverse: laureate head of Apollo wearing hair in knot with two locks on his neck; small lyre behind. Reverse: frontal image of Diana Lucifera standing facing right, holding lighted long torch in each hand, with bow and quiver on her shoulder; inscription on left: M . F; on right: P. CLODIVS. 42 BCE. Syd. 1117. Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo.

Ring of the Empress Josephine ~ Gold ring studded with blue and cut to form the center the letters "NB" (Napoleon Bonaparte), with both sides of foliage. The outer periphery of the ring carries on blue enamel background the inscription: "Love sincere."

Ring of the Empress Josephine ~ Gold ring studded with blue and cut to form the center the letters "NB" (Napoleon Bonaparte), with both sides of foliage. The outer periphery of the ring carries on blue enamel background the inscription: "Love sincere."

Napoleon - An Intimate Portrait

Napoleon - An Intimate Portrait

Buried alive - "Because of this fear," Estes said, "they developed a coffin alarm. This was a bell attached to the headstone with a chain that led down into the coffin to a ring that went around the finger of the deceased. So, if you were to wake up and find yourself accidentally buried, you could pull on the chain and ring the bell in the cemetery yard. - Great idea!

Buried alive - "Because of this fear," Estes said, "they developed a coffin alarm. This was a bell attached to the headstone with a chain that led down into the coffin to a ring that went around the finger of the deceased. So, if you were to wake up and find yourself accidentally buried, you could pull on the chain and ring the bell in the cemetery yard. - Great idea!

The remarkable Broighter hoard, arguably the finest treasure trove of the Irish Iron Age, was discovered on a February evening in 1896 by two Derry men, Thomas Nicholl and James Morrow. They had been ploughing a stubble field adjacent to the shoreline of Lough Foyle when they suddenly hit something hard.

The remarkable Broighter hoard, arguably the finest treasure trove of the Irish Iron Age, was discovered on a February evening in 1896 by two Derry men, Thomas Nicholl and James Morrow. They had been ploughing a stubble field adjacent to the shoreline of Lough Foyle when they suddenly hit something hard.

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