Explore Second Millennium, Minoan Palace and more!

Explore related topics

Phaistos Disc - Discovered in Crete, the disc is features i241 impressions of 45 distinct symbols, some of which are easily identifiable as people, tools, plants and animals. But because nothing else like it from the same time period has ever been found, archaelogists haven’t been able to provide a meaningful analysis of its content.

Phaistos Disc - Discovered in Crete, the disc is features i241 impressions of 45 distinct symbols, some of which are easily identifiable as people, tools, plants and animals. But because nothing else like it from the same time period has ever been found, archaelogists haven’t been able to provide a meaningful analysis of its content.

Phaistos Disk; Minoan Artifact. It currently lives in the museum of Heraklion. (Crete) The disc was discovered in 1908 by the Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier in the Minoan palace-site of Phaistos, and features 241 tokens, comprising 45 unique signs, which were apparently made by pressing hieroglyphic "seals" into a disc of soft clay, in a clockwise sequence spiraling toward the disc's center.

Phaistos Disk; Minoan Artifact. It currently lives in the museum of Heraklion. (Crete) The disc was discovered in 1908 by the Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier in the Minoan palace-site of Phaistos, and features 241 tokens, comprising 45 unique signs, which were apparently made by pressing hieroglyphic "seals" into a disc of soft clay, in a clockwise sequence spiraling toward the disc's center.

Sumerian Star Chart. Sky Map of Ancient Nineveh. c.3300 BCE. Reproduction of a Sumerian star map or “planisphere” recovered in the late 19th century from the 650 BCE underground library of Ashurbanipal. Long thought to be an Assyrian tablet, computer analysis has matched it with the sky above Mesopotamia in 3300BC and proves it to be more ancient Sumerian origin. The tablet is an “Astrolabe”, the earliest known astronomical instrument.

Sumerian Star Chart. Sky Map of Ancient Nineveh. c.3300 BCE. Reproduction of a Sumerian star map or “planisphere” recovered in the late 19th century from the 650 BCE underground library of Ashurbanipal. Long thought to be an Assyrian tablet, computer analysis has matched it with the sky above Mesopotamia in 3300BC and proves it to be more ancient Sumerian origin. The tablet is an “Astrolabe”, the earliest known astronomical instrument.

Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas
Search