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by Lemuel Francis Abbott.George Macartney, 1st Earl Macartney and Sir George Staunton, 1st Baronet

by Lemuel Francis Abbott.George Macartney, 1st Earl Macartney and Sir George Staunton, 1st Baronet

Valeriano Bécquer. Retrato de Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer. 1862 Fotografía realizada por Pepe Morón

Valeriano Bécquer. Retrato de Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer. 1862 Fotografía realizada por Pepe Morón

Thomas Lawrence. Captain Sir Edward Pellew, later 1st Viscount Exmouth. circa 1797. National Maritime Museum.

Thomas Lawrence. Captain Sir Edward Pellew, later 1st Viscount Exmouth. circa 1797. National Maritime Museum.

Captain Peter Parker (John Hoppner, ca. 1808-1810) - Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet (1785 – 1814) was an English naval officer, the son of Vice-Admiral Christopher Parker. In 1810, he was given command of the frigate Menelaus, which he commissioned. In 1814, Menelaus was sent to Bermuda. Leading his marines, he was hit in the thigh (as his grandfather had been at the Battle of Sullivan's Island), but unlike his grandfather, Parker died on the field of a severed femoral artery.

Captain Peter Parker (John Hoppner, ca. 1808-1810) - Sir Peter Parker, 2nd Baronet (1785 – 1814) was an English naval officer, the son of Vice-Admiral Christopher Parker. In 1810, he was given command of the frigate Menelaus, which he commissioned. In 1814, Menelaus was sent to Bermuda. Leading his marines, he was hit in the thigh (as his grandfather had been at the Battle of Sullivan's Island), but unlike his grandfather, Parker died on the field of a severed femoral artery.

George Brydges Rodney (13 February 1718 – 24 May 1792) was a British naval officer. He is best known for his commands in the American War of Independence, particularly his victory over the French at the Battle of the Saintes in 1782. It is often claimed that he was the commander to have pioneered the tactic of "breaking the line".

George Brydges Rodney (13 February 1718 – 24 May 1792) was a British naval officer. He is best known for his commands in the American War of Independence, particularly his victory over the French at the Battle of the Saintes in 1782. It is often claimed that he was the commander to have pioneered the tactic of "breaking the line".

Captain Thomas Massingberd (b.1763), RN by James Northcote, Date painted: 1787, Oil on canvas, 75 x 62.5 cm, Collection: National Trust - Gift from Sir Archibald and Lady Montgomery-Massingberd as part of the Gunby Hall Collection, 1944

Captain Thomas Massingberd (b.1763), RN by James Northcote, Date painted: 1787, Oil on canvas, 75 x 62.5 cm, Collection: National Trust - Gift from Sir Archibald and Lady Montgomery-Massingberd as part of the Gunby Hall Collection, 1944

Sir Thomas Lawrence | Charles Stewart, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry | L1163 | The National Gallery, London

Sir Thomas Lawrence | Charles Stewart, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry | L1163 | The National Gallery, London

Portrait of Captain George Montagu (1750–1829), circa 1780-1790, Attributed to Thomas Beach (1738-1806) or Lemuel Francis Abbott (c.1760–1802)

Portrait of Captain George Montagu (1750–1829), circa 1780-1790, Attributed to Thomas Beach (1738-1806) or Lemuel Francis Abbott (c.1760–1802)

The Art of Fooling the Eye.  Anamorphosis, which employs distorted perspective to create coded images that only become understandable when viewed from the right angle. The most famous example of anamorphosis is to be found in Hans Holbein's The Ambassadors (one of my favorite paintings), where a strange blur at the bottom of the painting...

The Art of Fooling the Eye. Anamorphosis, which employs distorted perspective to create coded images that only become understandable when viewed from the right angle. The most famous example of anamorphosis is to be found in Hans Holbein's The Ambassadors (one of my favorite paintings), where a strange blur at the bottom of the painting...

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