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August 1920 - Women are given the right to vote when the Amendment to the United States constitution grants universal women's suffrage. Also known as the Susan B. Anthony amendment, in recognition of her important campaign to win the right to vote.

Alice Paul. Alice Paul Toasting Tennessee's Ratification of the 19th Amendment, August 1920: The leader of the suffrage movement's most militant wing, Alice Paul advocated "unladylike" tactics such as civil disobedience and hunger strikes. In 1920, she proposed an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, which has never been ratified.

Alice Paul. Alice Paul Toasting Tennessee's Ratification of the 19th Amendment, August 1920: The leader of the suffrage movement's most militant wing, Alice Paul advocated "unladylike" tactics such as civil disobedience and hunger strikes. In 1920, she proposed an Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution, which has never been ratified.

Sometimes Change Begins With One Person – Like This Woman Who Changed The World (VIDEO)

Sometimes Change Begins With One Person – Like This Woman Who Changed The World (VIDEO)

After the passage of the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act in 1919, the making and selling of alcohol was illegal. This federal policeman uses a pickax to destroy a rum-runner's cargo in San Francisco during Prohibition.

After the passage of the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act in 1919, the making and selling of alcohol was illegal. This federal policeman uses a pickax to destroy a rum-runner's cargo in San Francisco during Prohibition.

Sepia-tone photograph of Mary Fields, holding a rifle. "Stagecoach Mary" was the first African American woman to deliver U.S. mail on a star route, by horse-drawn cart and sometimes snowshoes in Montana winters. She was beloved in her adopted town of Cascade, MT. "In 1959, actor and Montana native Gary Cooper wrote an article for Ebony in which he said: 'Born a slave somewhere in Tennessee, Mary lived to become one of the freest souls ever to draw a breath, or a .38.'"

Sepia-tone photograph of Mary Fields, holding a rifle. "Stagecoach Mary" was the first African American woman to deliver U.S. mail on a star route, by horse-drawn cart and sometimes snowshoes in Montana winters. She was beloved in her adopted town of Cascade, MT. "In 1959, actor and Montana native Gary Cooper wrote an article for Ebony in which he said: 'Born a slave somewhere in Tennessee, Mary lived to become one of the freest souls ever to draw a breath, or a .38.'"

Quaker cape and cap, 1780,   image displayed with blanket permission from: www.costumes.org

Quaker cape and cap, 1780, image displayed with blanket permission from: www.costumes.org

Dorothy Newell, an outgoing young woman with a sense of humor, promotes women's enfranchisement by wearing the words "Votes for Women" emblazoned on her back. Suffragists tirelessly publicized their cause in more conventional print forms, churning out banners, flyers, posters, articles, and newspapers © Underwood & Underwood/Underwood & Underwood/Corbis.

Dorothy Newell, an outgoing young woman with a sense of humor, promotes women's enfranchisement by wearing the words "Votes for Women" emblazoned on her back. Suffragists tirelessly publicized their cause in more conventional print forms, churning out banners, flyers, posters, articles, and newspapers © Underwood & Underwood/Underwood & Underwood/Corbis.

Rosa Parks was the most famous civil rights women activist. She refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger. By doing so she created a surge of courage in the United States which influenced hundreds of other civil rights activists.

Rosa Parks was the most famous civil rights women activist. She refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus to a white passenger. By doing so she created a surge of courage in the United States which influenced hundreds of other civil rights activists.

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